Weather News

Finally, a mostly dry day after tumultuous night. Hot weather predicted, storms later

Torrential rains in the Kansas City area result in many calls for water rescues

Emergency responders helped a driver from a vehicle that was stranded when high water from Brush Creek came out of its banks onto Indian Lane just east of Mission Road on Friday night in Mission Hills.
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Emergency responders helped a driver from a vehicle that was stranded when high water from Brush Creek came out of its banks onto Indian Lane just east of Mission Road on Friday night in Mission Hills.

Kansas City residents can expect a dry day Saturday after severe storms brought tornadoes and flooding to the area Friday night, according to the National Weather Service.

“Today is gonna be fairly nice out there other than the fact that it’ll be hot and humid,” said Jonathan Kurtz, a meteorologist in the National Weather Service Pleasant Hill office.

Kurtz said there may be a few pop up thunderstorms during the afternoon Saturday but things should stay fairly quiet during the day.

Another line of storms is expected to roll through the area after 10 p.m. Saturday night and stick around until 10 a.m. or 11 a.m. Sunday morning, Kurtz said.

The biggest concern from those storms will be flash flooding.

According to the National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center Kansas City has a moderate risk of excessive rainfall Saturday.

Flash flooding was a major issue in Friday night’s storms as well, prompting multiple calls for water rescues throughout the area.

The Kansas City Fire Department tweeted that it had responded to more than 20 calls for rescues by 9:26 p.m. Friday night.

The National Weather Service said two tornadoes were confirmed via radar last night, one near Lake Lotawana in Missouri and one four miles west of Lake Lafayette near Odessa.

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Katie Bernard covers Kansas crime, cops and courts for the Kansas City Star. She joined the Star in May of 2019. Katie studied journalism and political science at the University of Kansas.

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