Weather

Two rounds of severe storms, and possibly tornadoes, headed to KC in next few days

What is the difference between single cell, multi-cell and super cell thunderstorms?

Ever heard of the term 'supercell' but didn't know what it was? Learn about these powerful storms responsible for most tornadoes in the United States and other thunderstorms in this video from NWS.
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Ever heard of the term 'supercell' but didn't know what it was? Learn about these powerful storms responsible for most tornadoes in the United States and other thunderstorms in this video from NWS.

The Kansas City area could see two rounds of severe thunderstorms, including the possibility of tornadoes, in the next few days as a severe weather outbreak cuts across the central part of the United States.

The outbreak of severe weather, which is expected to begin Friday and continue into early next week, will come from two storm systems, according to Bob Larson, senior meteorologist with AccuWeather.

“It’s kind of a one-two combination,” he said.

All types of severe weather threats are possible with these storms, including tornadoes, large hail, damaging winds, heavy rains and flooding.

For the immediate Kansas City area, the period of greatest danger appears to center on Saturday afternoon and night, Larson said.

Prior to that, western and central Kansas are looking at a possible severe storm threat Friday and Friday night. By Sunday, that threat will shift to the eastern and southeastern part of Missouri.

The second threat of severe storms comes later Monday or Monday night.

The multi-day active storm pattern is the talk of weather circles because this is the first time the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center has indicated that there’s a chance for severe thunderstorms somewhere in the country for each of the five days in its extended severe weather outlook.



Those days are Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday.

The disadvantage with the extended forecast is that the storms are still so far out that it only provides a general sense of where severe storms are possible. It doesn’t pinpoint exactly where and precisely when the severe storms will strike, Larson said.

The forecasts, however, allow people to prepare for severe weather, including being ready for any possible power outages and having non-perishable food available, as well as knowing where to go in case of a tornado warning.

“You’ll want to be close to a source that can broadcast warnings to you so that you’re aware of any individual severe storms or tornado warnings or flash flood warnings that may be issued with these storms,” Larson said.

Thunderstorms could move into the Kansas City area as early as Friday night, according to the National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill. Multiple rounds of thunderstorms, with the chance of severe weather, are possible this weekend and into next week.

These storms could lead to new flash flooding as well as renewed river flooding, according to the weather service.

Warm and humid temperatures are likely for the rest of the work week, with highs reaching into the upper 80s to near 90 degrees. If temperatures don’t reach 90 degrees, it will feel like they did in some areas because of humid conditions.

“We are pretty much in the heart of severe weather season now . . . ,” Larson said. “This is something we can’t take lightly and we have to be prepared for.”

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Robert A. Cronkleton gets up very early in the morning to bring readers breaking news about crime, transportation and weather at the crack of dawn. He’s been at The Star since 1987 and now contributes data reporting and video editing.


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