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  • Is health care a fundamental right?

    Gary Sallee, 65, a resident of Oak Grove, has a good quality of life, dabbles in wood burning artwork and finds contentment as a gardener. An automobile accident 30 years ago left Sallee a quadriplegic. Now, Sallee argues that taxpayers are better off helping to provide him in-home care — a publicly funded service at risk of deep cutbacks in Missouri — instead of paying much more for Sallee to live 24/7 in a nursing home.

Gary Sallee, 65, a resident of Oak Grove, has a good quality of life, dabbles in wood burning artwork and finds contentment as a gardener. An automobile accident 30 years ago left Sallee a quadriplegic. Now, Sallee argues that taxpayers are better off helping to provide him in-home care — a publicly funded service at risk of deep cutbacks in Missouri — instead of paying much more for Sallee to live 24/7 in a nursing home. Tammy Ljungblad and Rick Montgomery The Kansas City Star
Gary Sallee, 65, a resident of Oak Grove, has a good quality of life, dabbles in wood burning artwork and finds contentment as a gardener. An automobile accident 30 years ago left Sallee a quadriplegic. Now, Sallee argues that taxpayers are better off helping to provide him in-home care — a publicly funded service at risk of deep cutbacks in Missouri — instead of paying much more for Sallee to live 24/7 in a nursing home. Tammy Ljungblad and Rick Montgomery The Kansas City Star

Behind ‘repeal and replace’ debate, a question: Is health care a fundamental right?

July 22, 2017 7:00 AM