Johnson County EMS medical director Ryan Jacobsen shows examples of devices that could be used to administer the drug naloxone. This week, the Kansas Legislature passed a bill to allow the drug naloxone — which saves lives by stopping opioid overdoses — to be distributed similarly to an EpiPen to family members and patients who are prescribed opioids for pain management.
Johnson County EMS medical director Ryan Jacobsen shows examples of devices that could be used to administer the drug naloxone. This week, the Kansas Legislature passed a bill to allow the drug naloxone — which saves lives by stopping opioid overdoses — to be distributed similarly to an EpiPen to family members and patients who are prescribed opioids for pain management. Shane Keyser skeyser@kcstar.com
Johnson County EMS medical director Ryan Jacobsen shows examples of devices that could be used to administer the drug naloxone. This week, the Kansas Legislature passed a bill to allow the drug naloxone — which saves lives by stopping opioid overdoses — to be distributed similarly to an EpiPen to family members and patients who are prescribed opioids for pain management. Shane Keyser skeyser@kcstar.com

Kansas catching up on access to opioid overdose meds

March 31, 2017 07:00 AM

More Videos

  • Democrats Schumer, Pelosi comment on government shutdown

    On the anniversary of President Donald Trump's inauguration, Americans awoke to the first day of a government shutdown and Congress staged a weekend session to show voters it was trying to resolve the stalemate. Republicans and Democrats showed no signs of ending their standoff over immigration and spending on Saturday. Critical government functions will continue, with uniformed service members, health inspectors and law enforcement officers set to work without pay. But if no deal is reached before Monday, hundreds of thousands of federal employees will be furloughed.