University of Missouri

Larry Borom commits to Mizzou’s family atmosphere, NFL track record

Offensive lineman Mitch Morse (65), pictured playing for the University of Missouri on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014, is one of plenty former Tiger offensive linemen who’ve gone on to the NFL. Morse was drafted 49th overall in the second round of the 2015 NFL Draft.
Offensive lineman Mitch Morse (65), pictured playing for the University of Missouri on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014, is one of plenty former Tiger offensive linemen who’ve gone on to the NFL. Morse was drafted 49th overall in the second round of the 2015 NFL Draft. AP

Family is important to Brother Rice senior offensive lineman Larry Borom.

He comes from a single-parent family in Detroit and helps care for his 7-year-old sister, Terri, who he walks to the bus stop each morning during the school year.

Family is also a big reason he committed Saturday to the Missouri football team during the “Night at the Zou” prospect camp.

“They kept reiterating the fact that it’s a family-oriented place,” Borom said. “Being far away, that’s what really sold me. Coming from my background, family is what we base everything on.”

Those aren’t hollow words from Borom.

“Larry is a gentleman and a high-character person …,” Brother Rice coach Dave Sofran said. “You couldn’t ask for a better human being than Larry Borom. Missouri is going to get a high-quality person and someone who will be a good teammate and care for others.”

Borom — even at 6-feet-6 and 335 pounds — is an under-the-radar prospect, who primarily played right guard last season.

Rivals and Scout give him two stars, while 247 Sports pegs him as a three-star prospect and ESPN lists no rating by scouts.

Eastern Kentucky is the only other Football Bowl Subdivision offer he’s listed with, according to Rivals.

Borom also said he’d been offered by a handful of Division II schools, while programs like Michigan State, Purdue and Bowling Green have shown some interest.

Still, Sofran described Borom as “a diamond in the rough,” which isn’t shocking given that Borom’s first love was basketball. He didn’t start playing football until his freshman year at Brother Rice.

“I knew in the back of my head there was a slim chance of going to school for basketball,” Borom said. “I had a greater chance of football, so I put basketball on the back burner and just focused on football.”

Borom has good feet and athleticism, especially for his size, but there’s still room to improve his hand placement and ability to transfer his bulk to raw power.

“He started being developed and in the last year and a half has really emerged in terms of his growth and loving football,” Sofran said. “In terms of his upside, I think he’s got a huge ceiling and he’s with the right offensive line coach (Mizzou’s Glen Elarbee) to develop that talent. He’ll really be able to master the craft of the offensive line when he gets there. I see nothing but potential with him.”

If Borom, who hopes to slim down to the 320-pound range, can improve his technique and learn to finish blocks in a filthy fashion, he has tremendous upside as a tackle prospect.

“I think Missouri got a steal by coming into Michigan and finding a kid that is under the radar in terms of the number of stars behind his name,” Sofran said. “His length, his size and his athleticism — I think he could be an NFL prospect. I really believe that.”

Sofran would know. He also coached Packers guard T.J. Lang, a Brother Rice alumnus, and said Borom is bigger and more athletic than the same point in Lang’s development.

“Missouri has produced a lot of lineman in the NFL the last few years,” Borom said. “When I see those numbers, I think that they can do it.”

But how does his mom, Joelle Hershman, feel about him going 600 miles from home to play football?

“I’m in good hands,” Borom said, “so she’s happy with it. … And I know I’m solid. I like the school and everything about the program. That’s all there is to it.”

Tod Palmer: 816-234-4389, @todpalmer

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