University of Kansas

KU football coach says parents of injured player who needed ambulance are in Lawrence

KU coach gives update on player taken from practice in ambulance

Kansas Jayhawks football coach David Beaty gives update on freshman offensive lineman Jacobi Lott, who was taken from practice in an ambulance following an injury on Aug. 8, 2018.
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Kansas Jayhawks football coach David Beaty gives update on freshman offensive lineman Jacobi Lott, who was taken from practice in an ambulance following an injury on Aug. 8, 2018.

Kansas coach David Beaty said Thursday that offensive lineman Jacobi Lott remains in stable condition following a practice injury Wednesday that required an ambulance call.

Beaty said Lott’s parents came to Lawrence on Wednesday night to be with him. The coach, citing privacy concerns, did not reveal any more information on Lott’s condition other than to say he was “responding normally” and “continuing to be evaluated.”

“The way I look at it, it’s never going to be moving on to the next play (after an injury stops practice). It’s going to be making sure, before we do, that the kid is in good condition, he’s stable and that his well-being is taken care of,” Beaty said. “Because your kids are affected by that type of stuff too.”

Beaty praised KU football’s sports medicine team, which placed the emergency call.

“Just watching the organization and how they operated that situation, watching (athletic trainer) Owen Stanley and watching the person that was responsible for loading the 911 call ... it was impressive,” Beaty said.

KU linebacker Joe Dineen said Beaty kept the team informed about Lott’s status after the injury, which happened midway through Wednesday’s workout.

“Obviously we’re thinking about Jacobi,” Dineen said, “but we know he’s in good hands.”

Lott, a true freshman from Amarillo, Texas, was one of the school’s highest-rated recruits this offseason, choosing the Jayhawks over a late offer from Texas. His father, Charlie, played football at Texas Tech, while uncle Ronnie played 14 seasons in the NFL, earning an induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2000.

“He’s a hard worker. He’s a really good kid. I think he’s going to be really good for us,” Dineen said of Lott. “He’s a big body, and you can tell when he gets out there, he’s physical. I think when he gets back, he’s going to be really good for us.”

Dineen said only one other time — in a youth league — had he seen an ambulance come to a football field to help with treatment for an injury.

Beaty said calling for additional personnel was something that would be done if player safety was in question at all.

“You always hope that they come out and turn out to be false alarms, and fortunately, a lot of them do, but some of them don’t,” Beaty said. “So we take all of them with the highest level of precautions when it comes to what takes place with these young men.”

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