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Power outages, high water reported as storm moves through Kansas City area

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Ever heard of the term 'supercell' but didn't know what it was? Learn about these powerful storms responsible for most tornadoes in the United States and other thunderstorms in this video from NWS.
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Ever heard of the term 'supercell' but didn't know what it was? Learn about these powerful storms responsible for most tornadoes in the United States and other thunderstorms in this video from NWS.

Update: A flash flood advisory was issued for the Kansas City area Sunday morning. A story with updated weather information is posted here.

Kansas City and the surrounding metropolitan area remained under a flash flood warning until 3:15 a.m. Sunday as storms moved across the region late Saturday night, dropping heavy rain and knocking out power for thousands.

The National Weather Service issued a flash flood warning that includes Wyandotte, Leavenworth and Johnson counties in Kansas and Jackson, Platte, Clay and Cass counties in Missouri.

The weather service, based in Pleasant Hill, Missouri, said the rain is expected to move slowly through the southern and eastern parts of the metro.

Both the weather service and Kansas City Fire Department were warning people via Twitter late Saturday night to avoid driving through flooded roadways as the heavy rain inundated parts of the city.

As of 10:45 p.m. Saturday, KCP&L was reporting that more than 2,600 customers in Jackson County and more than 2,900 in Cass County in Missouri were without power, according to its online outage map. On the Kansas side, the company was reporting more 2,400 in Johnson County without power.

A flash flood watch that was issued earlier Saturday remains in effect until early Monday morning. According to the weather service, 1 to 4 inches of rain is possible now through late Sunday night as severe weather persists.

A severe thunderstorm watch was also extended for parts of the Kansas City metro until 5 a.m. Sunday.

Flooding is one of the leading causes of weather related fatalities in the U.S., according to the NWS. More than half of these deaths occur in motor vehicles when people attempt to drive through flooded roads.

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Kaitlyn Schwers covers breaking news and crime at night for The Kansas City Star. Originally from Willard, Mo., she spent nearly three years reporting in Arkansas and Illinois before returning to Missouri and joining The Star in 2017.
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