Crime

KCK police chief responds to suit claiming detective got false evidence by forcing sex

KCK police chief responds to lawsuit alleging sexual coercion, false evidence

A lawsuit was filed Thursday in federal court on behalf of Lamonte McIntyre and his mother. McIntyre was deemed wrongfully convicted for a double murder in Kansas City, Kan., more than two decades ago.
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A lawsuit was filed Thursday in federal court on behalf of Lamonte McIntyre and his mother. McIntyre was deemed wrongfully convicted for a double murder in Kansas City, Kan., more than two decades ago.

A man deemed wrongfully convicted for a double murder in Kansas City, Kan., more than two decades ago has filed a lawsuit against the city and police for alleged sexual coercion and fabricated statements that led to his arrest.

The lawsuit was filed Thursday in federal court on behalf of Lamonte McIntyre and his mother, Rose Lee McIntyre.

Kansas City, Kan. Police Chief Terry Zeigler responded to the lawsuit on Friday in a two and a half minute video posted on the Police Department’s Facebook page.

The lawsuit names as defendants the city, the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and police officers who worked on the case at the time, including a detective identified as Roger Golubski.

“For decades, the Kansas City Police Department (KCKPD) permitted Detective Roger Golubski to terrorize an entire community — by using his badge to extort sexual favors from poor black women and by coercing and manipulating those women into providing fabricated evidence to close his cases,” the lawsuit said.

The department posted Zeigler’s video response as a result of numerous media inquiries the chief said he received asking him to comment on the lawsuit.

Zeigler said he could not comment about the specific allegations in the lawsuit filed on behalf of McIntyre and his mother.

“Since I am not a party in the lawsuit it would be inappropriate for me to speak about any of the specific allegations mentioned in it,” Zeigler said.

Zeigler said the Police Department had never received complaints externally or internally regarding any of the allegations mentioned in the lawsuit and therefore did not investigate.

However, the Kansas City FBI field office has looked into those allegations, he said.

The lawsuit centers around the 1994 arrest and conviction of Lamonte McIntyre for two shooting deaths.

McIntyre, who was 17 at the time of the arrest, was found guilty of killing Doniel Quinn, 21, and Donald Ewing, 34, and spent 23 years in prison as part of two life sentences. McIntyre, now 42, was released from prison last year after the district attorney moved to dismiss the case.

After being wrongly imprisoned for a double-murder for the past 23 years, Lamonte McIntyre walked out of Wyandotte County Courthouse a free man Friday to cheers from family, friends, and supporters.

As previously reported by The Star in 2016, no physical evidence, gun or motive had tied McIntyre to the murders.

Instead, within hours of the crime — and based on the vague account of one witness who said the killer looked somewhat like a young man she knew with the name Lamonte — Lamonte McIntyre was arrested, despite alibis from family members who swore he had spent the day at home.

It also alleged Golubski and others coerced two witnesses to falsely identity McIntyre as the gunman.

The lawsuit also said police “fabricated a false statement attributed to Lamonte McIntyre,” “failed to conduct any meaningful investigation of the homicides” and “suppressed and failed to disclose exculpatory evidence.”

The plaintiffs are asking for a jury trial to be conducted and seek compensatory and punitive damages.

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