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MRIGlobal wins $54 million contract from the National Institutes of Health

MRIGlobal has won a 10-year contract to help develop and test drug ingredients for eventual use in human clinical trials. The contract was awarded to the Kansas City research institute through the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.
MRIGlobal has won a 10-year contract to help develop and test drug ingredients for eventual use in human clinical trials. The contract was awarded to the Kansas City research institute through the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The Kansas City Star

MRIGlobal has won a $54 million program contract from the National Institutes of Health to help develop and test drug ingredients for eventual use in human clinical trials.

The 10-year contract was awarded to the Kansas City research institute through the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

MRIGlobal chief executive Thomas M. Sack said the program has the potential to “literally transform the lives of so many impacted by stroke and a multitude of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, autism, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis and migraines.”

Roger K. Harris, MRIGlobal’s associate vice president for global health security, said the research institute expects to collaborate with the University of Kansas, the University of Kansas Medical Center and the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences on the contract.

Pam Sharitz-Tesch, external communications manager for MRIGlobal, said the contract was “significant” and “sizable” for the institute, which has had NIH contracts since 1969. This is its first contract with the neurological arm.

MRIGlobal, formerly the Midwest Research Institute, described the scope of the project as “process development and preparation of active pharmaceutical ingredients” as well as ingredient analysis and testing. The program involves testing at the manufacturing, packaging, labeling, storage and distribution stages before clinical neurological drug trials.

The National Institutes of Health is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

To reach Diane Stafford, call 816-234-4359 or send email to stafford@kcstar.com. Read more from Diane at kansascity.com/workplace. Twitter: @kcstarstafford.

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