Business

World Series risks call for insurance

Bonfires were set in the middle of Willie Mays Plaza outside AT&T Park in celebration of the San Francisco Giants’ World Series victory in 2012.
Bonfires were set in the middle of Willie Mays Plaza outside AT&T Park in celebration of the San Francisco Giants’ World Series victory in 2012. Spartan Daily

Win or lose, World Series fans can get rambunctious, and that means liability insurance can come into play in Kansas City and San Francisco in the days ahead.

We’ve all seen videos of car-tipping celebrations or other vandalism that turns on fans’ frustrations. Personal injuries also happen more often when more folks are around.

“People will be in a mood to celebrate,” said Chris Hackett with the Property Casualty Insurance Association of America.

Most homeowners, car owners and businesses would be covered by their normal liability coverage for normal injuries and property damage spawned by the World Series, Hackett said.

Businesses, however, may need to top off their coverage for special events they hold around the games.

For example, setting up a huge tent in the company parking lot to handle and serve overflow customers similarly expands the company’s possible liability. Check on your insurance coverage in that case, suggested Lori Shaw, executive director of risk solutions in Aon’s global entertainment group.

Serving or selling alcohol also can change insurance circumstances, Shaw said.

Renting a suite to entertain customers at sporting events also carries insurance issues. The Kansas City Area Development Council, for example, uses sporting events to woo businesses that consider moving here. The group typically has to provide the game venue a certificate showing it has liability coverage for the event.

Not all insurable World Series issues involve risks of personal or property injury.

Shaw said Aon helps clients with insurance to cover business promotions that offer free customer payoffs if a hometown team wins. The cost can be sizable, and the insurance can carry at least part of the burden.

“We actually help them come up with ideas,” Shaw said.

Hackett said homeowners probably are covered by their existing homeowners policy when they entertain friends and family, for example, around the game broadcast. At least so long as they are not charging them to attend.

Even renting out a room to visitors who stay at your home instead of a hotel should fall within normal homeowners coverage, Hackett said. Standard coverage, he added, extends only to an occasional rental, not to regular boarding.

To reach Mark Davis, call 816-234-4372 or send email to mdavis@kcstar.com. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter at mdkcstar.

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