Business

Scott Tucker’s Leawood house headed for estate sale after seizure by IRS agents

Scott Tucker is seen here in his Leawood home during an interview with Netflix for its “Dirty Money” series.
Scott Tucker is seen here in his Leawood home during an interview with Netflix for its “Dirty Money” series. File

This story clarifies an earlier version to note that the June 28 estate sale will sell furnishings of the home. The house itself will likely be sold in a separate transaction.

Imprisoned payday loan mogul Scott Tucker’s residence in Leawood is going up for an estate sale later this month as part of an ongoing attempt by the government to recover assets he acquired through his illegal enterprises.

The furnishings in Tucker’s house in the Hallbrook subdivision is the subject of an estate sale that starts June 28 and extends to June 30.

The estate sale will sell furnishings in the house

Internal Revenue Service agents took possession of the 4,500-square-foot house in March after Tucker’s wife abandoned the property, leaving furnishings, an artwork collection and exercise equipment behind. The house itself will likely be sold in a separate transaction.

Tucker was convicted in 2017 on multiple charges related to a $2 billion payday loan business that authorities said extended usurious consumer loans under terms that deceived borrowers. He’s serving a 16-year, 8 month federal prison sentence. The forfeiture order looks to claw back Tucker’s proceeds and property he acquired from money had made through his businesses.

Authorities have also recovered two Porsche vehicles and a Land Rover.

Viewers of Netflix series Dirty Money may recognize Tucker’s Leawood residence, where portions of the documentary were filmed.

Tucker’s wife, Kim Tucker, has argued in federal court that she is entitled to some of what authorities recover in the aftermath of Tucker’s conviction, including $100,000 from the sale of the Leawood property, an amount she said she contributed from the sale of assets she owned before she married Tucker. She’s also looking to keep $1 million in investment and trust accounts.

“For the government to leave me, who has not been charged with a crime, penniless by taking every cent in every banking or brokerage account and both my homes simply by saying that my husband gave me everything is not accurate nor ethical and is simply disturbing,” Kim Tucker wrote to a federal judge in April.

The Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department announced last year that they had recovered $505 million from Tucker’s businesses that would be redistributed to borrowers who had been taken by the deceptive loans.

The FTC, which sued Tucker and his businesses in 2012 and later won a record-setting $1.3 billion judgment, appointed a receiver to recover assets belonging to Tucker and his various enterprises. So far, the receiver has recovered nearly $12 million, according to court documents.

If you owe taxes but can’t pay, be sure to file a tax return on time to avoid the failure to file penalty.

Related stories from Kansas City Star

  Comments