Business

Olathe’s Honeywell plant gains jobs from closures in Wichita, Washington state

A Google Street View image of the Honeywell Aerospace Electric Systems plant in Olathe.
A Google Street View image of the Honeywell Aerospace Electric Systems plant in Olathe. Google

The Honeywell Aerospace facility in Olathe is expected to gain what could be several hundred new employees over the next year to 18 months, the result of closures in Wichita and Washington state.

A Honeywell spokesman confirmed Friday that the company is centralizing its repair and overhaul operations and will move jobs from Wichita and Renton, Washington to Olathe. The Johnson County plant is just south of the intersection of Kansas Highways 7 and 10.

“We own the facility. It’s centrally located. It’s got the ability to handle the additional work,” Honeywell spokesman Scott Sayres told The Star.

Sayres declined to say how many jobs are involved, but Olathe Chamber of Commerce CEO Tim McKee said Friday it was his understanding that it’s “hundreds of jobs.”

“It is very important to us that they are coming to Olathe,” McKee told The Star. “This only helps us solidify that Olathe is going to be an aviation hub for Honeywell.”

The Kansas PEAK program, which provides state tax incentives for companies that expand business operations in Kansas, was offered for 119 net new jobs coming from out of state, according to Susan NeuPoth Cadoret, division director at the Kansas Commerce Department. Additional information on those incentives was not immediately available.

The Olathe facility was built in 1998 as an aviation headquarters for AlliedSignal, which acquired Honeywell in 1999 and took the Honeywell name. It handles maintenance and refurbishment of aviation equipment and electronics and manufactures safety and flight control systems, including the so-called “black box” flight data and voice recorders.

It is a massive facility, designed for a large workforce that has never quite materialized, McKee said, so it has excess capacity.

McKee said it was his understanding that the jobs are coming to Olathe in part because of the area’s strong labor force and lower cost of doing business.

The Kansas City Business Journal reported that the Olathe facility currently has about 550 employees, down from about 1,000 in 2008. The number of jobs moving from Washington state was not available. The Wichita Business Journal reported that about 175 employees are affected by the closure of that operation near Wichita Eisenhower National Airport.

Honeywell will move the Wichita operation to Olathe by the end of this year and the Renton operation over the next 18 months, Sayres said.

Regarding the Wichita move to Olathe, Sayres said in a statement, “This is not a decision we made lightly as we realize this, unfortunately, affects valued employees. We’ve provided employees with extensive notice and are also posting roles in Olathe, many of which include potential relocation assistance.”

Olathe’s Honeywell plant is not to be confused with the sprawling Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies facility in south Kansas City, which has about 3,000 employees. Honeywell manages the U.S. Department of Energy’s Kansas City National Security Campus, which produces non-nuclear components for nuclear weapons as part of the nation’s defense program.

Lynn Horsley reports on Johnson County for the Kansas City Star, focusing on government, politics, business development and battles over growth and change in the county. She previously covered City Hall in Kansas City for 19 years and has a passion for helping readers understand how government affects their lives.


Lynn Horsley reports on Johnson County for the Kansas City Star, focusing on government, politics, business development and battles over growth and change in the county. She previously covered City Hall in Kansas City for 19 years and has a passion for helping readers understand how government affects their lives.


  Comments