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Will ‘Queer Eye’ still make you cry? These 5 themes about new KC season point to yes

After three seasons of make-betters, is it possible for “Queer Eye” to take self-care to the next level?

In the Netflix show’s fourth season, the Fab 5 say: Yes, of course!

Hosts Antoni Porowski (food), Jonathan Van Ness (grooming), Karamo Brown (culture), Tan France (fashion) and Bobby Berk (design) take on a new cast of “heroes” (what the show calls its makeover recipients) over eight episodes. Both seasons three and four were filmed during the five months the crew lived in Kansas City in 2018, but the new season was just revealed in June.

Netflix let us preview all eight episodes and, after we dried our eyes, here’s what we learned about self care: It’s not just about haircuts, new shoes and new furniture (though those are good, too), but about how celebrating ourselves can help us connect more with — and give more to — those we love.

Of course, Kansas City still looks fabulous in all the dramatic shots of our skyline. In one episode, our gorgeous Midwest sunset got compliments.

But we’re here to share five heartwarming themes to expect from the upcoming season of “Queer Eye,” which will be available July 19. Break out the tissues.

Community is everything

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The fourth season of “Queer Eye” takes Jonathan Van Ness back to his high school to help his music teacher. Christopher Smith Netflix

This season brings many of its diverse heroes closer to their community — whether that community is a nonprofit organization celebrating Latin arts or daughters, siblings or nieces.

Most of the makeover recipients struggle with isolation, but learn how to rebuild their connection to those closest to them. While previous seasons of “Queer Eye” addressed this theme before, this season deepens the reach. A father of a self-sufficient 10-year-old daughter realizes he has depression; a mother dedicated to her drill team realizes she’s not given enough time to her adult daughters.

Even Jonathan gets a moment to reconnect with his hometown when he gives his high school music teacher a makeover.

Give to yourself to give to others

Many of the heroes from this season spend their days giving to other people.

A Kansas City man who was paralyzed after being shot started a nonprofit organization to help the disabled; a Kansas City Army veteran helps build tiny homes for homeless veterans.

But though their lives are based around service, the Fab 5 quickly learn how these heroes don’t know how to serve themselves, or help themselves heal.

The season shows the ripple effect self-love has on those around you. Self-care becomes about providing for yourself, then for your family or community, and how empowering that can be.

The best of Bobby

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Bobby Berk, who is from Missouri, had a range of design challenges in season four. Christopher Smith Netflix

Bobby giving living spaces complete makeovers is not new to “Queer Eye.”

In the third season, the show expanded the challenge to include its first business: Jones Bar-B-Q in Kansas City, Kansas. In this season, Bobby redesigns a home to accommodate the show’s first disabled hero.

But this season also gives Bobby, who is from Missouri, the chance to show how well he understands the needs of his clients.

From a wheelchair-accessible home to an office with artistic flair to a cozy lounge for teachers, Bobby shows how people can feel pampered by comfortable, well-planned spaces.

He even faced the challenge of a house with practically no furniture.

Bobby taught each person the connectivity that can come with having a place that feels like home.

It’s all about letting go, henny!

Season four challenges its “heroes” in ways we’ve never seen before: a beloved teacher gets rid of a haircut she’s had for 30 years, the same Army veteran learns to let his kids sleep in another room without fearing for their safety, an older man who lived with his parents has to clear the house of their stuff, 15 years after they died.

Cue the tears.

This season focuses on how people’s pasts aren’t the sole thing that defines them. The Fab 5 teaches its heroes how to redefine themselves, while still treasuring and honoring the “you” they were 20 years before.

More hip-tips, Fab 5 fun

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In the fourth season of “Queer Eye,” the Fab 5 hosts continue to transform lives. Christopher Smith Netflix

One of the notable elements of “Queer Eye” is Antoni’s love of avocados, but it’s nothing compared to his reaction when he spots a corgi. His eyes go wide and he practically can’t move from the doorway as he says, “No one told me there was going to be a corgi here!”

But Karamo doesn’t have the same ... love ... for farm animals. A visit to a farm in Harrisonville had the culture connoisseur cringing.

There’s fun scenes of Jonathan dancing, more of Bobby’s home lighting techniques and, of course, a lot of Tan’s French tucks.

If you plan on watching the show from the first episode to last, be prepared for a slow start. But by the nostalgic last episode, it’ll be worth it. And stay for the credits for some throwback photos of the Fab 5 as kids.

‘Queer Eye’ season 4

Available on Netflix July 19

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