Mary Sanchez

Mary Sanchez

Mary Sanchez: When fear rules, constitutional rights get trampled

The last U.S. Supreme Court case heard before the inauguration of Donald Trump as president harkened back to a horrendous episode of overreach after the Sept. 11 attacks. More than 760 immigrant men, mostly Muslim, were rounded up and held for months in detention centers, often under cruel conditions. None was ever charged with links to terrorism. It’s a cautionary tale for the new administration.

Mary Sanchez

Did we expect too much from Barack Obama on race?

A heinous hate crime in Chicago — a disabled white man tormented by four African-Americans — has given rise to a new round of questioning about Barack Obama’s impact on race in America. As he was called to comment on the case, many people listened to judge if he was condemning enough of the black perpetrators, consoling enough for the white victim.

Mary Sanchez

Rockettes balk at dancing for our POTUS-to-be

The ongoing saga of whether or not members of the Rockettes will dance at Donald Trump’s inauguration is a taste of the next four years. When and how will it be appropriate or pragmatic to react to the latest Trump offense or to recall the heinous rhetoric of his campaign?

Mary Sanchez

Why do some hate crimes, like the Jewish center killings, fail to resonate?

The recent conviction of Dylann Roof on federal hate crime charges stirred unresolved questions for a family member of an equally heinous crime by a white supremacist in Overland Park. In America, deranged people can kill with racial, ethnic, religious or any of a wide range of hatreds and receive far differing reactions from the national media, the general public and seemingly even from the forces of justice.

Mary Sanchez

Anti-immigrant bias costs America plenty

Recent immigrants to the U.S. are increasingly college-educated. It’s a slow shift that has been occurring largely unrecognized for decades now. Problem is, too often these highly educated immigrants wind up working low-skill jobs. The mismatch costs the U.S. economy. We not only lose the benefits of their talents, but also more than $10 billion in taxes each year.

Mary Sanchez

These young voters want to bring empathy back, because #WhatNow

“You may scream in the street, you may make a sign and march, but nothing will change if you allow your emotion to guide…” began a Facebook post by My Hoang Nguyen to kick off interest in a new group of Kansas City area millennials: WhatNow. The group will meet Tuesday at 5:30 at at All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church.

Mary Sanchez

We have to make our foreign reconstruction efforts count

The Kabul Grand Hotel was intended to add to the rebuilding and stabilization of Afghanistan. But the abandoned structure is now more representative of the complicated process of development in war-torn portions of the world. Afghans, like the Syrians, are part of a human wave of grief spreading across Europe as their homelands offer little opportunity and continued danger.

Mary Sanchez

Will Trump feed ‘Dreamers’ to the wolves?

In Donald Trump’s first days in office, he’ll need to throw a tasty morsel to supporters, something to prove that he’s still their man. A likely target will be the immigrant children now flourishing as college students and part of the workforce under one of President Barack Obama’s executive actions, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Mary Sanchez

Campaign will end; our toxic politics will endure

People have compared the 2016 presidential campaign to a reality show — by which they mean an absurd, sham version of the real thing. Well, I’m sorry, America, but this is our reality. And none of it can be disinfected with lemon-scented niceties after the election, regardless of who wins.

Mary Sanchez

‘Patient Zero’ and other myths about HIV/AIDS

It’s easy to cast HIV and AIDS as a footnote of yesteryear, a horrific epidemic that raged and then was brought under control by antiretroviral drugs. And yet, the spread of AIDS in the United States remains a cautionary tale, not just about the injustice of demonizing victims but also about the consequences of public fear, misinformation, bias and government stalling. Americans died needlessly. They still are.

Videos

Teen writes about living at home with the crack addict her mother married

"I sat outside my home and listened to my sister scream for help," wrote Kayla Perez, 21, of Overland Park, who is the author of the first story in a new book, "Welcome to My Neighborhood." It is framed as a children's book, similar to Golden Books, but the stories are true, dire and grim. They're written by teenagers in the Youth Ambassador program, including Perez, who penned her story when she was 17 years old and living under the same roof as a crack addict her mother had married. The book, a pro bono project of the advertising and marketing company VML, will be introduced to Kansas City civic leaders at a dinner Tuesday. The Youth Ambassador program promotes youth development and addresses social and academic challenges for underserved teenagers.
Tammy Ljungblad The Kansas City Star
Teen writes about living at home with the crack addict her mother married 1:47

Teen writes about living at home with the crack addict her mother married

Five memorable moments in the career of Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura 0:56

Five memorable moments in the career of Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura

Emotional Royals players speak at Yordano Ventura vigil 2:24

Emotional Royals players speak at Yordano Ventura vigil

One-minute scouting report of Super Bowl LI 1:08

One-minute scouting report of Super Bowl LI