When St. Louis police in riot gear chant “Whose streets? Our streets,” it’s meant to menace, to exclude. And not implausibly, to exult in the acquittal of Jason Stockley, the white former cop who shot and killed a 24-year-old black motorist, Anthony Lamar Smith.
When St. Louis police in riot gear chant “Whose streets? Our streets,” it’s meant to menace, to exclude. And not implausibly, to exult in the acquittal of Jason Stockley, the white former cop who shot and killed a 24-year-old black motorist, Anthony Lamar Smith. David Carson TNS
When St. Louis police in riot gear chant “Whose streets? Our streets,” it’s meant to menace, to exclude. And not implausibly, to exult in the acquittal of Jason Stockley, the white former cop who shot and killed a 24-year-old black motorist, Anthony Lamar Smith. David Carson TNS

St. Louis police crossed the line with ‘Whose streets? Our streets’ chant

September 19, 2017 4:33 PM

More Videos

  • The existing KCI can't be made secure for a post-9/11 world

    While the current KCI is not regarded as a security risk, officials say an airport designed in the early 1970s was not built for the security requirements of today.