Clay Scott examined an irrigation pivot with oldest son Ty in a corn field near their family farm in Ulysses, Kan. Scott is already feeling the effects of the depleted Ogallala Aquifer, from which he draws water to grow his crops. Some of his two dozen irrigation pivots are pumping just 150 gallons per minute now, down from thousands of gallons per minute when they were first drilled.
Clay Scott examined an irrigation pivot with oldest son Ty in a corn field near their family farm in Ulysses, Kan. Scott is already feeling the effects of the depleted Ogallala Aquifer, from which he draws water to grow his crops. Some of his two dozen irrigation pivots are pumping just 150 gallons per minute now, down from thousands of gallons per minute when they were first drilled. Travis Heying The Wichita Eagle
Clay Scott examined an irrigation pivot with oldest son Ty in a corn field near their family farm in Ulysses, Kan. Scott is already feeling the effects of the depleted Ogallala Aquifer, from which he draws water to grow his crops. Some of his two dozen irrigation pivots are pumping just 150 gallons per minute now, down from thousands of gallons per minute when they were first drilled. Travis Heying The Wichita Eagle

Kansas

July 24, 2015 4:27 PM

A drying shame: With the Ogallala Aquifer in peril, the days of irrigation for western Kansas seem numbered

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