Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon spoke in July in Kansas City at the convention of the National Council of La Raza, telling members of the Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization that he was vetoing legislation that would prevent immigrants who are in the country illegally from receiving money from the state’s A+ Scholarship Program. Missouri Republicans say they are confident they can override Nixon’s veto when the General Assembly meets in September.
Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon spoke in July in Kansas City at the convention of the National Council of La Raza, telling members of the Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization that he was vetoing legislation that would prevent immigrants who are in the country illegally from receiving money from the state’s A+ Scholarship Program. Missouri Republicans say they are confident they can override Nixon’s veto when the General Assembly meets in September. File photo by ALLISON LONG along@kcstar.com
Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon spoke in July in Kansas City at the convention of the National Council of La Raza, telling members of the Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization that he was vetoing legislation that would prevent immigrants who are in the country illegally from receiving money from the state’s A+ Scholarship Program. Missouri Republicans say they are confident they can override Nixon’s veto when the General Assembly meets in September. File photo by ALLISON LONG along@kcstar.com

Missouri GOP makes scholarship ban for students brought into country illegally a priority of veto session

August 31, 2015 05:16 PM

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