Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker holds up a crime scene photo of a weapon on Tuesday, Sept. 13, during a new conference at the Rose Brooks Center, a domestic violence shelter in Kansas City. Baker and other speakers, including Jackson County Executive Frank White (left) and Kansas City Mayor Sly James, urged the Missouri General Assembly to uphold Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto of legislation to expand concealed carry in the state, claiming the bill’s lack of permits or background checks to carry concealed weapons would make it easier for domestic abusers to have firearms.
Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker holds up a crime scene photo of a weapon on Tuesday, Sept. 13, during a new conference at the Rose Brooks Center, a domestic violence shelter in Kansas City. Baker and other speakers, including Jackson County Executive Frank White (left) and Kansas City Mayor Sly James, urged the Missouri General Assembly to uphold Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto of legislation to expand concealed carry in the state, claiming the bill’s lack of permits or background checks to carry concealed weapons would make it easier for domestic abusers to have firearms. Allison Long along@kcstar.com
Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker holds up a crime scene photo of a weapon on Tuesday, Sept. 13, during a new conference at the Rose Brooks Center, a domestic violence shelter in Kansas City. Baker and other speakers, including Jackson County Executive Frank White (left) and Kansas City Mayor Sly James, urged the Missouri General Assembly to uphold Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto of legislation to expand concealed carry in the state, claiming the bill’s lack of permits or background checks to carry concealed weapons would make it easier for domestic abusers to have firearms. Allison Long along@kcstar.com

KC Mayor, police officials urge legislature to sustain Nixon’s gun bill veto

September 13, 2016 11:40 AM

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