The digital era has changed many things, but printed school yearbooks still reign supreme. “It’s exciting to see everyone’s reaction when yearbooks are handed out in May,” says Kylie Cameron, a senior at Shawnee Mission North High School and sports editor for the school’s yearbook, The Indian. Here Cameron leafs through a book for design ideas while working on yearbook pages. The school is in Overland Park.
The digital era has changed many things, but printed school yearbooks still reign supreme. “It’s exciting to see everyone’s reaction when yearbooks are handed out in May,” says Kylie Cameron, a senior at Shawnee Mission North High School and sports editor for the school’s yearbook, The Indian. Here Cameron leafs through a book for design ideas while working on yearbook pages. The school is in Overland Park. Shane Keyser skeyser@kcstar.com
The digital era has changed many things, but printed school yearbooks still reign supreme. “It’s exciting to see everyone’s reaction when yearbooks are handed out in May,” says Kylie Cameron, a senior at Shawnee Mission North High School and sports editor for the school’s yearbook, The Indian. Here Cameron leafs through a book for design ideas while working on yearbook pages. The school is in Overland Park. Shane Keyser skeyser@kcstar.com

Hardback school yearbooks thrive even in the digital 21st century

February 16, 2016 12:00 PM

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