A beehive sits in a stack of ordinary-looking boxes. Inside, the bees construct a honeycomb filled with honey. Here beekeeper John Speckman checks a comb. The bees know their stuff: “When the nectar’s coming in, they just work. The more space you give them, the harder they work,” he says.
A beehive sits in a stack of ordinary-looking boxes. Inside, the bees construct a honeycomb filled with honey. Here beekeeper John Speckman checks a comb. The bees know their stuff: “When the nectar’s coming in, they just work. The more space you give them, the harder they work,” he says. JOHN SLEEZER The Kansas City Star
A beehive sits in a stack of ordinary-looking boxes. Inside, the bees construct a honeycomb filled with honey. Here beekeeper John Speckman checks a comb. The bees know their stuff: “When the nectar’s coming in, they just work. The more space you give them, the harder they work,” he says. JOHN SLEEZER The Kansas City Star

Shawnee beekeeper John Speckman has the sweetest job in the world

September 23, 2014 03:00 PM

UPDATED September 23, 2014 08:15 PM

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