Mallory White, a physical therapy student from Rockhurst University, guided Trace Bales, 3, as he drove his new battery powered car down the hall at the Children’s Center for the Visually Impaired. As part of a program called Go Baby Go KC, students in the physical therapy program have been modifying off-the-shelf cars for children with special needs.
Mallory White, a physical therapy student from Rockhurst University, guided Trace Bales, 3, as he drove his new battery powered car down the hall at the Children’s Center for the Visually Impaired. As part of a program called Go Baby Go KC, students in the physical therapy program have been modifying off-the-shelf cars for children with special needs. TAMMY LJUNGBLAD The Kansas City Star
Mallory White, a physical therapy student from Rockhurst University, guided Trace Bales, 3, as he drove his new battery powered car down the hall at the Children’s Center for the Visually Impaired. As part of a program called Go Baby Go KC, students in the physical therapy program have been modifying off-the-shelf cars for children with special needs. TAMMY LJUNGBLAD The Kansas City Star

Modified toy cars give kids with special needs a new way to get around

March 06, 2015 03:34 PM

UPDATED March 06, 2015 07:46 PM

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