Sahiya Garcia, 5 (from left), Trina Morrison, Michelle Stump, Josie Pritchard, 5, and Levi McPeak work on a classroom project assembling Chef Creole, a character from a children’s book, at the Children’s Center for the Visually Impaired.
Sahiya Garcia, 5 (from left), Trina Morrison, Michelle Stump, Josie Pritchard, 5, and Levi McPeak work on a classroom project assembling Chef Creole, a character from a children’s book, at the Children’s Center for the Visually Impaired. David Eulitt The Kansas City Star
Sahiya Garcia, 5 (from left), Trina Morrison, Michelle Stump, Josie Pritchard, 5, and Levi McPeak work on a classroom project assembling Chef Creole, a character from a children’s book, at the Children’s Center for the Visually Impaired. David Eulitt The Kansas City Star

For children with visual impairment, food is a way to explore their other senses

March 03, 2015 6:00 AM