For Pete's Sake

Hopefully, Apple’s CEO won’t forget Royals worker who got Indians’ ‘ransomed’ home-run ball

Apple CEO Tim Cook held up the 100th career home run ball hit by Cleveland Indians' Brandon Moss, in front of a "ransom note" of Apple products that will be given to Moss’ teammates in exchange for the ball, at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference event in San Francisco on Monday.
Apple CEO Tim Cook held up the 100th career home run ball hit by Cleveland Indians' Brandon Moss, in front of a "ransom note" of Apple products that will be given to Moss’ teammates in exchange for the ball, at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference event in San Francisco on Monday. The Associated Press

Apple CEO Tim Cook said Monday that he would give a bunch of his company’s products to members of the Indians’ bullpen, so that Cleveland’s Brandon Moss could get a baseball that meant a lot to him.

Last week, the Indians bullpen went public with its demands if it was going to return Moss’ home-run ball after he hit the 100th dinger of his career*. It came against Jeremy Guthrie and was hit into the Indians bullpen at Kauffman Stadium.

* It seems like 98 of those homers have come against the Royals, but it’s really only five, starting with the blast in the Wild Card Game last September.

Here is the video of the home run against Guthrie:

You’ll note that the ball was hit almost directly to a member of the Royals’ ground crew in the Indians dugout.

That’s Adam Wallace of Lee’s Summit. He is the one who first got the ball.

“All the pitchers in the bullpen asked me to give them the ball,” Wallace said. “I heard them talking about what they were going to ask for on the list. I thought it was pretty funny.”

Naturally, Wallace complied with the relievers’ request, and nearly all 11 of them asked for some sort of Apple product in their ransom note — or cash or a 50-gallon drum of lube. At Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco on Monday, Cook announced he would pay off the debt of Apple products.

Although Wallace said he didn’t think he was able to keep the ball, wouldn’t it be cool if Cook sent an Apple watch his way?

That’s not to say Wallace is getting a great gift by being in the opposing teams’ dugout. As a pitcher on the Raymore-Peculiar High School baseball team, he’s getting inside access to what it’s like to be a professional.

“It’s pretty cool seeing the pitchers and seeing their routines,” Wallace said.

To reach Pete Grathoff, call 816-234-4330 or send email to pgrathoff@kcstar.com. Follow him on Twitter: @pgrathoff.

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