For Pete's Sake

Rare astronomical event on Sunday night could be a good omen for the Chiefs

Total lunar eclipse, blood moon visible around the world

The blood moon was visible at different times in Australia, Africa, Asia, Europe and South America. The total eclipse lasted nearly two hours, with the entire event lasting closer to four hours.
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The blood moon was visible at different times in Australia, Africa, Asia, Europe and South America. The total eclipse lasted nearly two hours, with the entire event lasting closer to four hours.

Well, this can’t be a coincidence, right?

On Sunday night, there will be what is known as a “super wolf blood moon,” that will be at peak viewing not long after the AFC Championship Game between the Chiefs and Patriots ends.

NASA calls it “one of the sky’s most dazzling shows.” The event, which will be visible in Kansas City, will be at its totality at 11:12 p.m., just about an hour after the Chiefs’ game ends.

So what is a “super wolf blood moon?”

First, it’s a total lunar eclipse and the Baltimore Sun explains that the moon will appear “in a dim, rusty and sometimes blood-like hue (instead of being blackened out) because of sunlight being refracted through Earth’s atmosphere and around the planet.”

Space.com says the moon will become fully tinted with the red-orange color of sunset.

Yep, a red moon will shine in the sky not longer after the AFC championship game.

According to NASA, the moon will be at its closet point to earth in orbit and is often called a “supermoon” because it seems bigger and brighter on Earth.

But why a wolf moon? Per the Farmer’s Almanac, that’s the name given to the first full moon in January.

“Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside Indian villages. Thus, the name for January’s full Moon,” according to the Farmer’s Almanac.

KC Wolf, the Chiefs mascot, would undoubtedly like that.

While it’s possible this big red moon that shares the name of the Chiefs mascot will appear Sunday is just happenstance, but one could say it’s also an omen.

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From covering the World Series to the World Cup, Pete has done a little bit of everything since joining The Star in 1997. He writes about baseball and has a quirky blog that augments The Star’s coverage of area teams.

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