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Chiefs propose overtime rules change, but NFL exec Troy Vincent isn’t a fan

Andy Reid speaks with media at 2019 NFL Scouting Combine

Kansas City Chiefs head coach Andy Reid talked about a number of things from the status of safety Eric Berry to new defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo while meeting the media at the NFL Scouting Combine on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019 in Indianapolis.
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Kansas City Chiefs head coach Andy Reid talked about a number of things from the status of safety Eric Berry to new defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo while meeting the media at the NFL Scouting Combine on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019 in Indianapolis.

Former NFL cornerback Troy Vincent, now the NFL’s executive vice president for football operations, doesn’t seem to be the biggest fan of the Chiefs’ proposal to change overtime rules.

In Kansas City’s proposal, both teams would have the opportunity to possess the ball at least once in overtime, even if the first team scores a touchdown. Vincent seemed to suggest a change isn’t necessary in a conference call Friday.

“Data tells us since 2001, 80 percent of the time, both teams touch the ball,” said Vincent, a former NFL defensive back who played for Chiefs coach Andy Reid for several years in Philadelphia. “And just putting on my old cap, you’ve got to play D. You’ve got to stop the offense, and the offense get on the field, you’ve got to score. There’s something about that, not just tradition, but you’ve got to play ball.

“Typically when people raise it, it’s because they fell short on the other end. They didn’t, the team that won the toss, took the ball down the field, which happens maybe 20 percent of the time. Other than that, you’ve got to play ball.”

The Chiefs’ season came to an end with an overtime loss to the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship Game when New England won the coin toss and scored on the first possession. With the Patriots’ touchdown, the soon-to-be MVP and the Chiefs’ high-flying offense never got the chance to take the field.

Everybody wants a chance for guys to do what they do,” general manager Brett Veach said on PFT Live during the NFL Combine. “I don’t really see the downside of having that — especially when you have a player like Patrick Mahomes. It would have been a lot of fun, and I think a lot of people — if they weren’t already tuned in for a great game — they certainly wouldn’t have wanted to miss that overtime. It would have been fun. But again, that’s something the league will work out. Those guys are smarter than me, so they’ll figure out what the best plan of attack is.”

KC’s proposal would also eliminate overtime in the preseason and eliminate the overtime coin toss, awarding the decision to kick or receive, or which goal to defend to the initial coin toss winner.

While amendments to the overtime rules have been brought up by other teams, the Chiefs are the only one to submit a written proposal.

“We’ll see how the proposal fares in the votes,” said Rich McKay, chairman of the NFL Competition Committee. “We’ve had a lot of discussion about the overtime procedures over the years. It’s all been a good one driven by data.”

For the proposal to be adopted, it must get votes from 24 of 32 clubs at next week’s owners meetings in Phoenix.

The Chiefs have also proposed an amendment to Rule 15, Section 2 that would add a review of personal fouls — called or not called on the field — as plays subject to coaches’ challenge in the instant replay system.

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