Chiefs

Hall of Fame ring stolen from former Chiefs lineman Will Shields

Chiefs Hall of Famer Will Shields shows his Hall of Fame ring during a halftime ceremony in his honor in November 2015 at Arrowhead Stadium.
Chiefs Hall of Famer Will Shields shows his Hall of Fame ring during a halftime ceremony in his honor in November 2015 at Arrowhead Stadium. jsleezer@kcstar.com

One of former Chiefs guard Will Shields’ most prized possessions — his Pro Football Hall of Fame ring — was stolen while he and his family were in Colorado this week.

“It was burglarized,” Shields said by phone from Colorado on Wednesday. “I shouldn’t have even had it with me. I was traveling from one place to another, and that kind of thing, but … it happened.”

Shields, who was inducted into the Hall of Fame 2015 after a 14-year career with the Chiefs, has filed a police report but wanted to wait for a period of time before sharing many details of the incident.

“It’s frustrating but my family is fine and safe, and that is what’s most important,” Shields said. “As for the ring, it is what the ring stands for and the work behind it that is important.”

The ring is set in 14K gold with a total diamond weight of 1  3/4 carats. The outer diamonds create a “stadium” effect surrounding the football-shaped diamond center. It includes a blue gemstone and is customized to reflect each inductee’s career.

A likeness of the Hall of Famer’s bust, and his position and years in the NFL, appear on one side while his name; the Pro Football Hall of Fame logo and his enshrinement class is included on the other.

A spokesman for the Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio, could not say how much the ring is worth.

And Shields, one of 310 men to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, could not put a price on the value of what the ring means to him.

“It’s pretty valuable,” Shields said. “There are only so many of those made. That’s why hopefully it will show up.”

Shields, who was inducted into the Chiefs Hall of Fame in 2012 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 2011, played in a Chiefs franchise-record 224 regular-season games with 223 consecutive starts, plus eight playoff games.

He was selected the Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year in 2003, and his 12 consecutive Pro Bowl selections are tied for sixth most in NFL history.

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