Royals

Noah Wilson, Royals fan whose cancer fight drew national attention, dies at age 7

Noah Wilson, the Olathe boy whose fight against cancer and passion for the Royals made him a celebrity during Kansas City’s run to the 2014 World Series, died Tuesday night at age 7. Noah had Ewing’s sarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer. He is pictured with his father, Scott, before game two of the World Series between the Royals and San Francisco Giants last October.
Noah Wilson, the Olathe boy whose fight against cancer and passion for the Royals made him a celebrity during Kansas City’s run to the 2014 World Series, died Tuesday night at age 7. Noah had Ewing’s sarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer. He is pictured with his father, Scott, before game two of the World Series between the Royals and San Francisco Giants last October. tljungblad@kcstar.com

No more pain for Noah Wilson. No more chemotherapy.

The end came quickly in the Olathe 7-year-old’s fight against Ewing’s sarcoma, the boy’s father, Scott Wilson, said.

And the pain Noah’s family carries nests in the love and joy the Kansas City community shared with Noah when he became a favorite of Royals fans at the World Series in Kauffman Stadium last October.

“Noah was an incredible boy,” Scott Wilson told The Star on Wednesday. “He touched our family so deeply.” The online movement to get Noah to the World Series and the waves of support that followed “was a heart-warming experience we will cherish forever.”

His favorite player was first baseman Eric Hosmer, and the two had exchanged messages in video and in tweets.

“He loved the Royals,” Scott Wilson said. “His room is decked out with Royals stuff. Eric Hosmer really touched his heart.”

A tweet posted to Hosmer’s Twitter account said, “Wow. It absolutely kills me to say this, but RIP to my hero, Noah Wilson.”

The Royals tweeted: “Our hearts are broken. Thoughts and prayers to the family of our bravest little Royals fan.”

The odds were always poor against the aggressive bone cancer attacking Noah’s liver, kidneys and other parts of his body. He endured long hospital stays and constant treatment and tests.

There were ups and downs, with his last really good day coming Friday, his mother’s birthday. Scott and Deb Wilson and Noah’s three siblings celebrated with him.

“He was so happy,” Scott Wilson said. “He was running around and playing.”

But Saturday Noah became dizzy, and his health failed. He was back in Children’s Mercy Hospital. He fell unconscious Monday, and the family, with his doctors, decided to “let him be in peace,” the father said. He died Tuesday night.

“We laid there with him and prayed and sang with him,” Scott Wilson said. “My wife and I and him cuddled together. There was no sign of agony.

“We are happy he is in paradise. He’s pain-free. He’ll never have to go through any more chemotherapy or another poke or prick.”

They’ll carry the memories with them — how little Noah, before all the World Series attention, had already made his own mark, starting a campaign that raised more than $7,000 to make colorful Band-Aids available to children at his hospital.

He caught onto the Royals and their startling run into the playoffs while watching from his hospital bed. A family member’s idea to seek out World Series tickets caught fire, leading to an invitation for the whole family from former Yankees manager Joe Torre.

They’ll remember the fun Noah had meeting so many players and fans, getting the VIP treatment and being in Kauffman Stadium.

The baseball games go on, and the Royals are making another run for the playoffs. The Wilsons plan to watch.

“And we’re going to smile,” Scott Wilson said, “knowing Noah is watching, too.”

Kansas City Royals Eric Hosmer comments on the passing of seven-year-old Noah Wilson on Tuesday from Ewing's sarcoma. Video by John Sleezer/The Kansas City Star

The Star’s Matt Campbell contributed to this report.

To reach Joe Robertson, call 816-234-4789 or send email to jrobertson@kcstar.com.

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