Apple CEO Tim Cook spoke in a 2014 announcement of new products in Cupertino, Calif. Faced with a federal judge’s order to help investigators break into an iPhone allegedly used by one of the San Bernardino, Calif., shooters, Apple may well argue that the request would place an unreasonable burden on the company.
Apple CEO Tim Cook spoke in a 2014 announcement of new products in Cupertino, Calif. Faced with a federal judge’s order to help investigators break into an iPhone allegedly used by one of the San Bernardino, Calif., shooters, Apple may well argue that the request would place an unreasonable burden on the company. Marcio Jose Sanchez The Associated Press
Apple CEO Tim Cook spoke in a 2014 announcement of new products in Cupertino, Calif. Faced with a federal judge’s order to help investigators break into an iPhone allegedly used by one of the San Bernardino, Calif., shooters, Apple may well argue that the request would place an unreasonable burden on the company. Marcio Jose Sanchez The Associated Press

In phone security case, Apple isn’t the bad guy, and neither is the FBI

February 23, 2016 06:07 PM