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Storms threaten to dump more rain on Kansas City this week; flooding hazards continue

Air National Guard busy helping communities fight off Missouri River flooding

Because the Missouri River is so swollen, water is backing up into the Crooked River, threatening agricultural land in Hardin, Missouri. The Missouri Air National Guard has been deployed to fill sandbags there and elsewhere at risk of flooding.
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Because the Missouri River is so swollen, water is backing up into the Crooked River, threatening agricultural land in Hardin, Missouri. The Missouri Air National Guard has been deployed to fill sandbags there and elsewhere at risk of flooding.

It’s shaping up to be another wet week in the Kansas City area as storms will likely drench the metro and surrounding communities with several rounds of rain, some of it heavy.

The additional rains have communities near swollen rivers on edge as they continue to monitor for flooding.

The first round of rains could arrive in the metro area late Monday afternoon.

“We could see some isolated strong storms with maybe some gusty winds of 40 to 50 mph and nickle to quarter-sized hail,” said Jimmy Barham, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill.

But the storms are not expected to last long. Once the sun sets about 8:40 p.m., the storms are expected to move east of the city and dissipate, he said.

“If anyone is outside in that 5 to 9 (p.m.) type range from west to east side of the metro, that might be something to watch out for,” Barham said.

There will be a little break overnight, but storms are expected to roll into the Kansas City area again Tuesday morning, which could affect the morning rush hour.

A line of heavy rains and possibly some strong winds will push through the metro area about 7 a.m. before clearing out, Barham said.

How quickly those storms move out will determine whether the Kansas City area will see severe weather later Tuesday. There’s a lot of uncertainty in tomorrow’s severe weather forecast.

“If by early afternoon, we are still cloudy and cool, we are probably not going to have a lot of chances” for severe weather, Barham said. “If we start seeing a lot of sun and start getting hotter, that is when the chances increase.”

If severe weather does develop, the main threat will be hail and damaging winds. Tornadoes don’t appear to be much of a threat. They aren’t expected to move through the metro area until the rush hour, about 5 to 6 p.m.

There’s a chance for rain the rest of the week too. The storms will be more scattered Wednesday into Thursday, so not everyone will see rain, Barham said.

The heaviest rainfall, however, is expected Friday through Sunday morning, when widespread storms will likely dump 1 to 3 inches of rain.

“Flooding wise, we’ll have to watch the storm systems that come through the area Tuesday and Wednesday,” Barham said. “Thursday doesn’t look too bad. But Friday into Saturday, if we get a long-term rain event, we could start to see some flooding concerns even more then they already area going late into the week and early into next week.”

Typically, the Kansas City area gets about 5.23 inches of rain in the month of June. While the area will see a dry stretch next week, this month’s precipitation is expected to be slightly above average.

Because of flooding across the region, the weather service is urging people not to drive around barricades onto flooded roads.

The Clay County Sheriff’s Office on Sunday afternoon helped rescue a driver who drove around warning signs into high water on Old Missouri 210 and Bluff Road. The driver was cited for failing to obey a traffic control device.

“We have high water levels kinda everywhere,” the weather service’s Barham said. “A lot of low-lying roads and roads that typically aren’t covered in water are covered in water.”

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Robert A. Cronkleton gets up very early in the morning to bring readers breaking news about crime, transportation and weather at the crack of dawn. He’s been at The Star since 1987 and now contributes data reporting and video editing.

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