Government & Politics

Potential jurors in F. Glenn Miller Jr. trial are questioned about the death penalty

F. Glenn Miller Jr., who is representing himself, challenged some potential jurors who said they could not impose the death penalty.
F. Glenn Miller Jr., who is representing himself, challenged some potential jurors who said they could not impose the death penalty. tljungblad@kcstar.com

Day two of jury selection in the F. Glenn Miller Jr. capital murder trial focused squarely on the death penalty.

Potential jurors were questioned one by one about their ability to follow Kansas law and impose a death sentence if they find Miller guilty of capital murder.

“We’re beyond theory,” Johnson County District Attorney Steve Howe said. “This is the real deal.”

Most of the 50 people questioned Tuesday at the Johnson County Courthouse in Olathe said they would be able to impose such a sentence if the state proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

But those who said that, because of moral or religious reasons, they could not impose that penalty under any circumstances were dismissed from the panel.

Miller, who is representing himself, challenged some of those who said they could not.

He told one woman that the death penalty is the law and that if she didn’t follow it she is not a patriotic American. He asked another who opposed the death penalty if she believed in an eye for an eye and whether she supported the American wars in the Mideast.

Miller also took the opportunity to ask potential jurors about their trust in the federal government and whether they believed the “mainstream media” is independent or controlled.

He also asked if they believed the white race has the right to survive as a people.

The line of questioning mirrored some of the beliefs Miller has expressed in pretrial hearings and court documents.

Other potential jurors are scheduled to come to the courthouse Wednesday and Thursday for the same type of questions posed to Tuesday’s group.

The final phase of selection is scheduled for Friday morning. Testimony is set to begin Monday.

Miller, who is also known as Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., is charged in the April 13, 2014, shooting deaths of Terri LaManno outside the Village Shalom care center and William Corporon and his grandson, Reat Underwood, outside the Jewish Community Center. Both centers are in Overland Park.

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