U.S. officials said that CIA and other agencies now devote at most 10 percent of their budgets to Russia-related espionage, a percentage that has risen over the past two years. Critics say that U.S. intelligence agencies have been too slow to respond to Russia’s provocations, repeatedly enabling Russian President Vladimir Putin to gain an upper hand.
U.S. officials said that CIA and other agencies now devote at most 10 percent of their budgets to Russia-related espionage, a percentage that has risen over the past two years. Critics say that U.S. intelligence agencies have been too slow to respond to Russia’s provocations, repeatedly enabling Russian President Vladimir Putin to gain an upper hand. File photo by Alexander Zemlianichenko The Associated Press
U.S. officials said that CIA and other agencies now devote at most 10 percent of their budgets to Russia-related espionage, a percentage that has risen over the past two years. Critics say that U.S. intelligence agencies have been too slow to respond to Russia’s provocations, repeatedly enabling Russian President Vladimir Putin to gain an upper hand. File photo by Alexander Zemlianichenko The Associated Press

As Russia reasserts itself, U.S. focuses anew on the Kremlin

September 14, 2016 10:12 PM