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Not UFOs or weather balloons. The government (sort of) claims mystery orbs in KC sky

Twitter was going crazy with theories about mysterious white, spherical objects floating over Kansas City

Kansas Citians had their eyes to the sky Thursday evening, trying to get a glimpse of two mysterious white, spherical objects floating over the city.
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Kansas Citians had their eyes to the sky Thursday evening, trying to get a glimpse of two mysterious white, spherical objects floating over the city.

Kansas City jumped to its own conclusions when even the National Weather Service couldn’t explain unidentified flying objects high in the sky.

After all, aren’t meteorologists supposed to know what’s happening in the atmosphere?

The tweet from the NWS sparked speculation that the mysterious white orbs belonged to aliens.

Others contended they were simply weather balloons or Loon — a Google initiative to spread internet connectivity with balloons flying 12 miles above the earth.

But just hours after the National Weather Service brought attention to the mystery orbs, a KMBC reporter seemed to have solved the case. William Joy tweeted that the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, thinks the balloons belong to them.

DARPA is the “mad science division” within the Pentagon, tech news website Engadget says. It has about 220 employees and an annual budget of $3.4 billion, according to the agency.

Its projects have included high-energy lasers to stop missiles, flying trucks, packs of robotic animals for the battlefield and bullets that can change direction, according to Business Insider.



DARPA appears to be working on a balloon project, too. The agency tweeted Tuesday that it launched three balloons from Maryland for a test flight.

The goal behind its balloon program is to create a “lighter-than-air” vehicle that can navigate the skies 75,000 feet above the earth and travel long distances. The balloons navigate by changing elevation to take advantage of “different wind profiles.”

So, mystery solved?

A DARPA spokesman has not yet responded to McClatchy’s request for comment.

And some people still aren’t convinced it’s not a coverup for something other-worldly.

Chacour Koop is a Real-Time reporter based in Kansas City. Previously, he reported for the Associated Press, Galveston County Daily News and Daily Herald in Chicago.
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