Nation & World

Little boy creates new dog holiday called Wolfenoot. People can’t wait to celebrate

A 7-year-old boy in New Zealand has created a new holiday called Wolfenoot that celebrates people who have or have had dogs, or are kind to dogs. His idea has captured interest around the world as people prepare to celebrate on Nov. 23.
A 7-year-old boy in New Zealand has created a new holiday called Wolfenoot that celebrates people who have or have had dogs, or are kind to dogs. His idea has captured interest around the world as people prepare to celebrate on Nov. 23. Facebook/Wolfenoot

If you love dogs, your holiday season just got a little more jam-packed.

Behold a new holiday — Wolfenoot.

A 7-year-old boy in New Zealand dreamed it up, and when his mom wrote about it on Facebook, people around the world grabbed on to it in a flash. Now, it’s real.

The idea of a dog-themed holiday for the people who love them struck people as just so darn charming.

And, well, it’s dogs.

Scores of people are sharing on social media plans to celebrate the first Wolfenoot on Nov. 23.

The Facebook Event page set up for the holiday had more than 9,000 “interested” as of Friday.

I love the idea that we have a new holiday because of a 7-year-old kid, his mother, and the internet,” wrote Twitter user Satyros Brucato, aka @PsychotropicOwl.

AH-RHOOOOOO!!!!!

Jax Goss told Buzzfeed that her son is “constantly making things up. But I never in a million years expected that when he said, ‘Mom, I’m going to make a holiday ....’ it would actually happen from one of my many ‘here’s a cute story about my kid’ posts!”

Her Facebook post on Sept. 27 lit the interest.

My son has invented a holiday called Wolfenoot,” she wrote, without revealing her son’s name. “It is when the Spirit of the Wolf brings and hides small gifts around the house for everyone. People who have, have had, or are kind to dogs get better gifts than anyone else.

“You eat roast meat (because wolves eat meat) and cake decorated like a full moon.

“A holiday to the spirit of wolves that celebrates people who are kind to dogs? I can 100% get behind this. So we will be celebrating Wolfenoot. It’s on the 23rd November if anyone else is moved to celebrate it.”

When the idea took on a life of its own, Goss set up a website — Wolfenoot.com — with an “FAQ” page of everything you need to know about the holiday.

For instance, how do you pronounce “Wolfenoot?”

Wolf (soft English W) – a – noot (to rhyme with suit).” the page says.

Can vegetarians celebrate it, too?

Yes, of course!” Goss writes. “I think the driving spirit of the thing is the ‘being kind to animals”’ bit, not the ‘eating roast beast’ bit. Just adapt the meal to suit your own tastes/needs and go for it!”

Can people celebrate even if they don’t have a dog?

“Of course! Just be kind to them. Not everyone can have a dog. As long as you have the kindness, that’s all it takes.”

Why is it so close to Thanksgiving/Black Friday?

“Total happenstance. We’re in New Zealand, so neither of those things are on my child’s radar.”

Can I donate to shelters/wolf sanctuaries/dog based charities?

“Hell yes! I would absolutely LOVE for this to be a driving force for fundraising for these kind of things. I will start creating a list on the website. It would be bloody marvellous if you could combine your Wolfenoot celebration with giving to these organisations (or any that help/protect animals).”

Goss asked people to use the hashtag #wolfenoot so her son could see how his idea is spreading. And boy, are they.

Someone noticed that the holiday, by happenstance, falls on a full moon.

What’s the greeting, people wanted to know? Merry Wolfenoot? Happy Wolfenoot?

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