In this Dec. 16, 2015 photo, a crow just had its brain scanned at the University of Washington’s medical center in Seattle. The crow was part of research inspecting the bird’s brain activity at the sight of food. Over the years, University of Washington research has shown crows can recognize individual faces, and pass down through generations whether that face is friend or foe. In France, the historical theme park Puy du Fou has trained six crows to pick up litter tossed aside by visitors.
In this Dec. 16, 2015 photo, a crow just had its brain scanned at the University of Washington’s medical center in Seattle. The crow was part of research inspecting the bird’s brain activity at the sight of food. Over the years, University of Washington research has shown crows can recognize individual faces, and pass down through generations whether that face is friend or foe. In France, the historical theme park Puy du Fou has trained six crows to pick up litter tossed aside by visitors. Manuel Valdes Associated Press
In this Dec. 16, 2015 photo, a crow just had its brain scanned at the University of Washington’s medical center in Seattle. The crow was part of research inspecting the bird’s brain activity at the sight of food. Over the years, University of Washington research has shown crows can recognize individual faces, and pass down through generations whether that face is friend or foe. In France, the historical theme park Puy du Fou has trained six crows to pick up litter tossed aside by visitors. Manuel Valdes Associated Press