Nation & World

He was trying to go to sleep. Then this monster snake fell out of the ceiling

A boa constrictor escaped its home in an apartment in Pulaski, New York, and fell through the floor into the room below. The 6-foot red-tailed snake fell on a man sleeping in his bed.
A boa constrictor escaped its home in an apartment in Pulaski, New York, and fell through the floor into the room below. The 6-foot red-tailed snake fell on a man sleeping in his bed. Facebook/New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

Now I lay me down to sleep.

I pray the boa will not creep.

If I should die before I wake

I pray the cops the snake to take.

You think snakes on a plane are scary?

One poor guy in central New York was rudely awakened late last month when a snake fell through the ceiling and landed on him in bed.

It was not your garden-variety snake either, the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle reported.

It was a boa constrictor.

Six. Feet. Long.

With a red tail.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation released a photo of the scaly intruder on its Facebook page Wednesday.

It looks as frightening as you might think a 6-foot-long boa constrictor would look.

In a statement to media about this “unusual complaint,” state conservation officials said the man, who lives in Pulaski, New York, was in a panic when he called for help.

Conservation officers who investigated the June 29 incident found that the snake escaped its “enclosure” in the apartment above and somehow made its way into, then out of, the ceiling above the bed where the man slumbered.

They reported that the man, who was not named, was uninjured.

“The snake, which is legal to possess in New York, was reunited with its owner,” the department’s statement said.

According to Reptiles magazine, Anonymous Sleeping Man had an encounter with a fast-growing species of boa constrictor that can reach 6 feet in length in three years.

They are voracious eaters. Newborns snack on mice; adults pig out on rats. If handled from birth, most boa constrictors will remain calm and not dangerous, according to Reptiles.

But The Humane Society of the United States is not a fan of people keeping large constrictor snakes — such as pythons, boas and anacondas — as pets, calling them “powerful wild animals capable of killing an adult human.”

“Allowing private possession of these dangerous reptiles threatens public safety, environmental health and the welfare of the animals themselves,” the society says on is website, where it mentions that 12 people in the United States have died from constrictor snake-related incidents since 1990.

Allison Keller shared video captured by her security camera of a snake at her front door in Spring, Texas on March 27. She was woken up at 2 a.m. by an alert on her phone that movement was detected at her front door.

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