Nation & World

Woman who helped blind Cubs fan catch a cab is hailed as a good Samaritan

A young woman who helped a blind Chicago Cubs fan hail a cab over the weekend has become a viral star after a stranger photographed the good deed and posted it on Facebook.
A young woman who helped a blind Chicago Cubs fan hail a cab over the weekend has become a viral star after a stranger photographed the good deed and posted it on Facebook. Facebook

Ryan Hamilton recognized something special in a young woman’s random act of kindness in Chicago over the weekend, so he took pictures of it.

He saw Casey Spelman, 26, help a blind man wearing a Chicago Cubs jersey hail a cab.

Hamilton posted photos of the moment on his Facebook page, where thousands of people have thanked Spelman for being, as one person put it, “a decent human being.”

Hamilton wrote that he was in Wrigleyville on the rooftop of Old Crow Smokehouse when he saw Spelman, who was later identified my media.

“There was a blind Cubs fan trying to hail a cab for several minutes until the lady came up and asked him if he needed help hailing a cab,” he wrote in his post.

“She stood there with him until one pulled up. Awesome to see such kindness in a world that the media portrays so much hate in. Share freely in hopes that her kindness spreads.”

It was Spelman’s first trip to Wrigleyville and that moment was one of the highlights, she told Fox 59 in Indianapolis.

“I just said ‘hi are you trying to get a cab’ and he said ‘yes’ and I said ‘would you like some help’ and he said ‘that’d be great,’” she told the TV station.

The streets were packed right after the Cubs game, she said, and the man had been waiting a while to catch a cab.

WGN in Chicago identified the Cubs fan as Yusef Dale, an assistant U.S. attorney.

Dale said he found out he’d gone viral when a friend called and said, “you never accept help. How did it come to be that that day, you came to accept some help?”

Dale told WGN the area was loud and chaotic after the game, making it difficult for him to hear. He appreciated the way Spelman offered to help.

“She did not presume I was incompetent or unable,” he told WGN. “She didn’t get in my personal space, and most importantly, she didn’t touch me, which is an issue for some people with disabilities.

“It was one of those rare occasions I needed help. The power of social media is amazing. You fully appreciate it when you are fully impacted by it.”

The irony in the whole thing? Both Spelman and Hamilton, the man who photographed her, are from Indianapolis.

“It’s cool she’s getting the recognition but you could tell that’s not why she did it,” Hamilton told Fox 59.

  Comments