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TheChat: New rules light up Kansas City Democrat John Rizzo

Rizzo
Rizzo

It’s Thursday. We’re getting there...

▪ “This is such an improvement over what we’ve had in the past.” — Missouri state Rep. John Rizzo, a Kansas City Democrat, on new House rules designed to spread power over legislation.

New House Speaker John Diehl, a Republican, has redesigned the path for legislation. In the past, all bills were sent through the House Rules Committee. The chairman of that committee had enormous power to kill or move bills. No longer. Diehl has designed a new system that involves 13 “supercommittees” with authority over legislation. (link courtesy of johncombest.com).

▪ “We’ve never seen anything remotely like it.” — Rick Wilson, a Florida-based Republican consultant who has advised presidential campaigns, on the prospect that three establishment-wing candidates will be running for the GOP presidential nomination: Mitt Romney, Jeb Bush and Chris Christie.

Some conservatives are thrilled because they say the competition in the party’s more moderate wing could open the door for a conservative to claim the nomination.

▪ “Republicans are likely to have a far better field in 2016, so voters won’t lack for plausible Presidents.” — an editorial this week in The Wall Street Journal that slammed Romney for considering a third consecutive presidential run.

The scathing editorial began: “If Mitt Romnney is the answer, what is the question?” The question, the piece suggested, is why would Romney be a better candidate in 2016 than he was in 2012? Republicans appear to have a great field of candidates in 2016, so Romney’s candidacy isn’t essential, it said.

▪ “We’re not short on revenue. We’re spending way too much for the population that we have in Kansas.” — State Sen. Tom Arpke, a Salina Republican, on the cause of the budget crunch facing the state.

Arpke and other conservatives will be tested this session on whether they truly can cut spending. Experience suggests budget cuts are easy to talk about, tougher to actually implement.

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