Crime

Hickman Mills students may have eaten marijuana-laced brownies; police investigate

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Witnessing a crime and reporting it can be just as frightening as being the victim of a crime. Here’s what you should do if you witness illegal activity.

A report that Hickman Mills School District students might have been sickened after eating marijuana-laced brownies last month is under investigation by Kansas City police, the district said Monday.

“We are aware of a situation at one of our schools where students may have been sickened by a cannabis-infused food product,” the district said in a statement. “Making sure that everyone is safe when they come to school is always the priority.”

The incident happened in late March at the Hickman Mills Freshman Center at 9010 Old Santa Fe Road.

Assistant Principal John Miller called a police officer working at the school to his office about 2 p.m. March 28 regarding a student who had eaten a brownie possibly laced with an unknown substance, according to police.

The student complained that her stomach was hurting and that she felt strange, according to police. She said she had gotten the brownie from another student.

Another student told the officer that she had taken a bite of a brownie that was given to her by the same student, but she felt fine.

Miller called the student who was said to be sharing the brownies to the office and, after explaining why she was there, asked if she had any brownies in her possession. The student replied, “No.” She also said that they were not laced with anything, police said.

Miller searched her purse and jacket, but didn’t find any brownies, according to police.

The students were checked out by the the school nurse and then allowed to be picked up by their parents. Miller reported the incident to the Missouri Department of Social Services for follow-up.

“This is not an issue that is unique to Hickman,” district spokeswoman Marissa Cleaver Wamble said. “I think because it being legalized in some states, especially one nearby, that it is something that schools are having to deal with more.”

Robert A. Cronkleton gets up very early in the morning to bring readers breaking news about crime, transportation and weather at the crack of dawn. He’s been at The Star since 1987 and now contributes data reporting and video editing.


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