Lee's Summit Journal

Cosentino’s helps police reach out to residents

Lee’s Summit Police Chief Travis Forbes and Mayor Bill Baird received $3,000 in gift cards from Don Cosentino, James Cosentino, Dante Cosentino and Jimmy Cosentino Jr. for police to hand out to families in need.
Lee’s Summit Police Chief Travis Forbes and Mayor Bill Baird received $3,000 in gift cards from Don Cosentino, James Cosentino, Dante Cosentino and Jimmy Cosentino Jr. for police to hand out to families in need. Courtesy photo

Holiday giving this season was helped by a donation of $3,000 in gift cards from Consentino’s markets to members of the Lee’s Summit Police Department.

This was the first time the company worked with the Police Department.

Police were asked to identify people where they saw the need, and choose the recipients of the cards. Cosentino’s Food Stores owns and operates two Price Choppers in Lee’s Summit with locations in Woods Chapel Road and in Raintree on Greenwich Drive.

Lee’s Summit City MLK celebration

The Dream. Believe. Do. Celebration at The John Knox Pavilion is scheduled from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Jan. 21. The event, presented by the City of Lee’s Summit’s Human Relations Commission is a way to honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King. Attendees will enjoy performances by the Lee’s Summit High School Jazz Band, Cedar Creek Elementary, Lee’s Summit North Crimson Camerata, and the MLK Community Mass Choir. Visitors can see cultural booths representing Gambia, Kenya, Panama and Russia.

This year’s keynote speaker will be Lee’s Summit Mayor Bill Baird. This is a free event and the first 300 people in the door will receive a free T-shirt.

Firefighters Give $26,000

Lee’s Summit firefighters were able to give $26,000 to help Lee’s Summit Social Services thanks to their annual Boot Block. During the event, firefighters man the corner of Third and Douglas streets asking for passers-by to drop donations in their boots on behalf of Lee’s Summit Social Services.

Representatives of the IAFF Local #2195 presented a check to Lee’s Summit Social Services for $26,000 for money collected at the 2017 Boot Block — an annual tradition where firefighters work the busy downtown corner with boots in hand to collect for the Needy Family Fund.

Lee’s Summit Social Services Executive Director Matt Sanning said the annual boot block check is the largest one they receive each year.

“Their hearts are in the right place, always, for our organization. They want to keep the money local and support the local families,” Sanning said in a press release.

Longtime Lee’s Summit firefighter Dan Manley says the boot block is a tradition that extends back decades, but has gone for the last 25 years to families assisted by Lee’s Summit Social Services.

“The first year of the Boot Block, around 1984, we were averaging $7,000 to $8,000,” Manley said in a press release. “It seems like we would have a new peak each year; over a period of time, a city ordinance was established to limit fundraising taking place at that intersection, but the firefighter collection was preserved.”

The firefighters, both active and retirees, volunteer to participate in the boot block off duty to help raise the funds.

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