Lee's Summit Journal

Former Summit Technology Academy principal to head Pro Deo Youth Center

Elaine Metcalf
Elaine Metcalf
After retiring as principal at Summit Technology Academy this year, Elaine Metcalf quickly found another job working with young people.



Starting Aug. 1, Metcalf will become executive director of Pro Deo Youth Center at 214 N.E. Chipman Road, which describes itself as a relational organization providing resources, programming and one-on-one support for at-risk teens in Lee’s Summit.


“Her innovative educational knowledge and passion for our cause, assisting at-risk youth in the community, will enable her to strengthen our programs and services," said Pro Deo's board president, Hope Davis. "We are looking forward to Elaine’s leadership in engaging our stakeholders, bringing back after school programming this fall, and enhancing the sustainability of the organization.”


Metcalf spent more than 15 years with the Lee’s Summit R-7 School District, the last seven leading Summit Technology Academy. The academy, which accepts students from a number of local school districts, is part of the Missouri Innovation Campus shared with the University of Central Missouri. The school puts students on a fast track to a four-year college degree while they gain experience as interns with local companies.


Metcalf has served on the Lee’s Summit Chamber of Commerce’s Business Development Council since 2008 and in various task forces and summits for the Mid-America Regional Council. She holds a doctorate in education from William Woods University.



“I am excited to lead and grow the mission of Pro Deo Youth Center by providing a safe and caring environment for our youth,” Metcalf said. “All teens deserve a place where they fit in and can be surrounded by caring adult advocates; Pro Deo is just that place in our community.”



The faith-based organization, founded in 2010 by Kylie and Andy Ewing from an informal effort to connect with teens in a local park, was facing collapse last August because of a financial crisis. After appealing to the community for emergency funding, the non-profit announced in September that more than $70,000 had been donated or pledged, enabling it to continue operating and develop a plan for rebuilding.


More details about the organization can be found at www.prodeoyouthcenter.org.


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