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Hiroshima victim brings sister’s last paper crane to Truman Library

The Star

Masahiro Sasaki (center) embraces Clifton Truman Daniel after laying flowers on President Truman’s grave. Sasaki, a Hiroshima bombing survivor, came from Japan with son Yuji (left) to participate in a peace program at the Truman Library in Independence.
Masahiro Sasaki (center) embraces Clifton Truman Daniel after laying flowers on President Truman’s grave. Sasaki, a Hiroshima bombing survivor, came from Japan with son Yuji (left) to participate in a peace program at the Truman Library in Independence. madavis@kcstar.com

Hiroshima bombing survivor Masahiro Sasaki carried a wreath of flowers and placed them at the foot of President Harry S. Truman’s grave Thursday afternoon.

He stepped back, bowed his head and held his hands in prayer. When he was finished, he turned and hugged Clifton Truman Daniel, Truman’s oldest grandson.

Masahiro is the brother of Sadako Sasaki, who at age 12 died from leukemia after living through the bombing at Hiroshima in 1945.

Before she passed away, Sadako was following a Japanese tradition of creating a thousand paper cranes to fulfill her wish of better health.

Mashario brought her last crane from Japan to give to the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library as a symbol of peace and forgiveness.

“Our goal must be not peace in our time but peace for all time,” Masahiro told a crowd gathered Thursday evening for a program titled “Peace on Your Wings.”

Masahiro was accompanied by his son, Yuji Sasaki, and an interpreter, Kazuko Minamoto.

The group toured the presidential library with Director D. Kurt Graham. Masahiro stopped at one display that features the bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

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