Ric Gillespie, executive director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, holds a scrap of airplane wreckage that he contends is consistent with a window patch on the Lockheed Electra that Amelia Earhart was flying when she disappeared in 1937.
Ric Gillespie, executive director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, holds a scrap of airplane wreckage that he contends is consistent with a window patch on the Lockheed Electra that Amelia Earhart was flying when she disappeared in 1937. Joseph Kaczmarek The Associated Press
Ric Gillespie, executive director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, holds a scrap of airplane wreckage that he contends is consistent with a window patch on the Lockheed Electra that Amelia Earhart was flying when she disappeared in 1937. Joseph Kaczmarek The Associated Press

Has the key to Amelia Earhart’s disappearance in the Pacific been found in Kansas?

October 31, 2014 07:53 PM