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Flood warnings issued as rivers rise across Kansas City region and northwest Missouri

PSA: Turn around don’t drown

Flooding is one of the leading causes of weather related fatalities in the U.S., according to the NWS. More than half of these deaths occur in motor vehicles when people attempt to drive through flooded roads.
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Flooding is one of the leading causes of weather related fatalities in the U.S., according to the NWS. More than half of these deaths occur in motor vehicles when people attempt to drive through flooded roads.

Flood warnings have been issued across the Kansas City region as some rivers flood or approach flood state, according to the National Weather Service.

The weather service has issued flood warnings for Platte, Ray, Buchanan and Leavenworth counties, warning motorists not to drive through flowing water. Minor to moderate flooding is expected in several locations this week.

“Nearly half of all flood fatalities are vehicle-related,” the weather service warned. “As little as 6 inches of water may cause you to lose control of your vehicle. Two feet of water will carry most vehicles way.”

The warning comes as additional widespread rainfall is expected in the Kansas City area Tuesday and Wednesday.

The Platte River at Sharps Station in Platte County is expected to have minor to moderate flooding between Sunday afternoon and Thursday evening. At 9:30 a.m. Sunday the water level reached 25.4 feet. Flood stage is 26 feet. The river was expected to rise above flood stage by Sunday afternoon.

The river was expected to crest at 29.9 feet by Tuesday evening before falling back below flood stage before midnight Wednesday.

When the river reaches 26 feet, low-lying rural land begins to flood. At 29 feet, backwater floods Missouri Route KK along the Little Platte River near Missouri Route B.

The Platte River near Agency, Mo., will remain under a flood warning until Friday afternoon as the area was experiencing moderate flooding. The river had reached 25.1 feet Sunday morning, well above the flood stage of 20 feet.

The river was expected to crest near 26.2 feet by Monday morning and fall below flood stage by Thursday afternoon.

At 25 feet, flooding begins at the east border of Agency.

The Platte River near Platte City was expected to see minor flooding as the river will likely rise above flood stage by Monday morning and continue to rise near 23.6 feet by early Wednesday.

Flood stage is 20 feet, at which point cropland near Missouri 92 near Platte City begins to flood. At 22 feet, flooding occurs at Humphreys Access Area, which is 5 miles downstream from Platte City.

The Crooked River near Richmond, Mo., in Ray County was at 20 feet, which is considered flood stage. The river level was expected to fall below flood stage late Sunday morning.

At 20 feet, low-lying rural roads as well as cropland and woodlands flood.

The 102 River in Buchanan County near Rosendale, Mo., was expected to crest at 22.4 feet Sunday afternoon. At flood stage, which is 20 feet, Missouri 48 is flooded on the east and west sides of town, which prevents travel in and out of town.

Stranger Creek at Easton, Kan., in Leavenworth County is experiencing moderate flooding. The river was at 18.1 feet, which is above the flood stage of 17 feet.

The river was expected to fall below flood stage by late Sunday afternoon. At 18 feet, First Street in Easton and 231st Street north and south of Easton begins to flood. Low-lying fields south of Easton flood at 17 feet.

Next weekend, a few cities along the Missouri River are expected to have minor flooding. By March 17, the river is expected to rise to 22.1 feet in St. Joseph, 23.8 feet in Atchison, Kan., and 20.4 feet in Leavenworth, Kan. Flood stage is 21 feet in St. Joseph, 22 feet in Atchison and 20 feet at Leavenworth.

The Missouri River is expected to reach near flood stage at Sibley, Mo., later this week.

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Robert A. Cronkleton gets up very early in the morning to bring readers breaking news about crime, transportation and weather at the crack of dawn. He’s been at The Star since 1987 and now contributes data reporting and video editing.
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