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Totally pink RideKC bus draws attention to breast cancer awareness

RideKC bus turns pink for breast cancer awareness

The Kansas City Area Transportation Authority unveiled a 40-foot-long bright pink bus at a news conference Monday at Union Station in Kansas City as part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Even the seats inside the bus are pink.
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The Kansas City Area Transportation Authority unveiled a 40-foot-long bright pink bus at a news conference Monday at Union Station in Kansas City as part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Even the seats inside the bus are pink.

It was hard to miss the RideKC bus parked outside Union Station in Kansas City on Monday morning.

After all, the 40-foot-long bus wasn’t its typical blue and gray. Instead, it was bright pink — inside and out — with the word “Hope” on the side.

The Kansas City Area Transportation Authority unveiled the bus at a news conference as part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

“A lot of our employees wanted to talk about what we could do for Breast Cancer Awareness Month,” said Robbie Makinen, president and chief executive of the KCATA. “Thanks to our maintenance department and the folks in the shop, you see the result of that. This is our ‘Hope’ bus.”

The bus will run regular RideKC routes throughout the Kansas City metro area.

It will also be used as part of the Pink Ribbon Road Show, a partnership between the KCATA, Jackson County and the American Cancer Society to “drive breast cancer to the curb.”

The road show, which will feature the bus, runs the week of Oct. 17, with events held throughout the region. The road show ends with the American Cancer Society’s Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk, which will be held beginning at 7:30 a.m. Oct. 22 at Crown Center, 2405 Grand Blvd.

For information on the events, see the Pink Ribbon Road Show on Facebook.

“Breast cancer does not discriminate,” said breast cancer survivor Lonnie Bush, owner of Lonnie Bush Fitness in Raytown. “It does not care where you live, what kind of car you drive, what your nationality is. But early detection is vital.”

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, a breast cancer survivor, said that before her diagnosis, she was bad about getting mammograms. It was only after constant urging that she followed through.

“Listen to the people around you who care about you and are encouraging you to get mammograms as you should at your age and based on your risk factors,” McCaskill said. “And know that all of us in this club (of breast cancer survivors) are here to support you.”

Robert A. Cronkleton: 816-234-4261, @cronkb

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