Health Care

Undisclosed ethical lapse leads to license suspension for KCK chiropractor

The Kansas Board of Healing Arts suspended a Kansas City, Kan., chiropractor’s license last week after he failed to complete an ethics exam. But the board’s orders are so heavily redacted its impossible to tell why he was assigned the exam.
The Kansas Board of Healing Arts suspended a Kansas City, Kan., chiropractor’s license last week after he failed to complete an ethics exam. But the board’s orders are so heavily redacted its impossible to tell why he was assigned the exam. Kansas Board of Healing Arts

The Kansas Board of Healing Arts suspended the license of Kansas City, Kan., chiropractor Zachary Baker last week for failing to complete an ethics exam the board had previously assigned him.

But neither Baker nor the board is saying why he was assigned the exam in the first place.

Baker had been licensed to practice chiropractic medicine since December 2015 and worked alongside his brother at Baker Chiropractic and Acupuncture, a clinic their father founded in 1976.

The board issued an order publicly censuring him in October 2016, but it’s so heavily redacted it’s impossible to determine why he was censured. The order says Baker violated K.S.A. 65-2836(k), a section of Kansas law that states, “The licensee has violated any lawful rule and regulation promulgated by the board or violated any lawful order or directive of the board previously entered by the board.”

No other details are given.

The board allowed Baker to continue practicing, but ordered him to take and pass an Ethics and Boundaries Assessment Services exam within six months.

According to the EBAS website, the company’s purpose is to “provide post-licensure appraisal of the moral compass of ethically challenged professionals. EBAS primarily serves as an agency dedicated to assisting regulatory/licensing agencies in their evaluation of a licensee’s understanding of ethical and boundary issues relevant in their professional workplace environment.”

The board issued another order on June 16 suspending Baker’s license because he failed to complete the training, which Baker admitted in a phone interview this week.

“I had to do some sort of ethics course that was going to cost $1,500 and I’m new in the practice here, so it’s just not something I can afford,” Baker said.

He made the affordability argument to the board as well, but its order suspending his license says the board dismissed it because Baker had taken trips to Mexico and Hawaii after being ordered to take the ethics exam and was planning another trip to Hawaii.

The board of healing arts regulates the licenses of thousands of Kansas medical practitioners in 16 different professions, including physicians, physical therapists and chiropractors.

Baker is the eighth person in Kansas whose license has been suspended or revoked this year and the first in the Kansas City metro area.

Baker said he remains at the family clinic, working the front desk, and his suspension would not affect patients because his brother is covering for him. He declined to say why he’d been assigned the ethics exam.

“It was just something they required me to complete and that was basically it,” Baker said.

Kathleen Selzler Lippert, the executive director of the board, said it was not something required of every licensed chiropractor, but declined to give any details beyond what was in the board’s redacted public orders.

“Some information in those documents has been redacted because it is not public based on Kansas statutes,” Lippert said.

Andy Marso: 816-234-4055, @andymarso

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