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The Star’s 2014 Quilt Project, Block 12: Built by KC, shared with the world

Special to The Star

Quilt Block 12: Heavenly Puzzle
Quilt Block 12: Heavenly Puzzle

Today we’re introducing the final block of The Star’s 2014 quilt project, “Where Poppies Grow … Remembering Almo,” including instructions on how to finish your quilt.

The quilt honors those who served in World War I and tells the story of Almo Ebenezer O’Kell.

Block 12: “Heavenly Puzzle”

One of the finest World War I monuments is the Liberty Memorial in Kansas City, which houses the National World War I Museum (theworldwar.org). Before entering the museum proper, visitors must cross the glass-floored Paul Sunderland Bridge. Under the bridge is a field of poppies, 9,000 in all, each representing 1,000 lives lost in the Great War.

In Memory Hall, the names of the 441 Kansas City area residents who died while serving their country can be found on the four “We Are the Dead” bronze tablets. Sgt. 1st Class Almo E. O’Kell is listed as a noncommissioned officer.

In 1921, Gen. John J. Pershing, Lt. Gen. Baron Jacques of Belgium, Gen. Armando Diaz of Italy, Marshal Ferdinand Foch of France and Adm. Lord David Beatty of Great Britain were invited to the dedication ceremony at the Liberty Memorial construction site. It was the first time the five Allied commanders had been together. They stood on a makeshift stage among other dignitaries before a crowd of about 100,000.

Construction began on the monument July 5, 1923. Delays and rising costs plagued the project.

Although the memorial was not yet finished, an extravagant dedication ceremony took place on Armistice Day, Nov. 11, 1926. At exactly 11 a.m., a bell tolled denoting the hour the armistice had been signed. President Calvin Coolidge began his speech on the eighth anniversary of the end of the war.

The “Poppies” quilt was designed by Denniele O’Kell Bohannon of Louanna Mary Quilt Design, Harrisonville, and Janice Britz of Bee Merry Farms, Peculiar, as a tribute to Bohannon’s great-grandfather, Almo Ebenezer O’Kell. Angela Walters of Quilting Is My Therapy in Kearney did the free-motion quilting.

BLOCK 12, ‘HEAVENLY PUZZLE’

Block size: 14 inches finished

Supply list

6 inches by 9 inches red fabric

12 inches by 15 inches blue fabric

17 inches by 19 inches background fabric

2-inch square gold fabric

10 inches by 8 inches fusible web

Black embroidery thread, optional

31 inches brown bias strip (previously made)

Cutting directions

From the red fabric, cut:

4 pieces using template (A)

2 (2 5/8-inch) squares (C). Cut from corner to corner once on the diagonal.

From the blue fabric, cut:

4 pieces using template (B)

4 pieces using template (Br)

4 (4 1/8-inch by 2 1/4-inch) rectangles (D)

1 (2-inch) square. Apply fusible web and cut 1 circle using template 2

From the background fabric, cut:

4 (2 5/8-inch) squares (C). Cut from corner to corner once on the diagonal.

4 triangles using template (E)

1 (2 1/4-inch) square (F)

2 (3 1/2-inch by 9 1/2-inch) rectangles

2 (3 1/2-inch by 15 1/2-inch) rectangles

From the green fabric, apply fusible web and cut:

34 leaves using template 3

From the gold fabric, apply fusible web and cut:

1 star using template 1

Construction

Sew a red A piece to a blue B piece. Add a background C triangle. Press toward the blue. Sew a background E triangle to a blue Br piece, and add a background C triangle. Press toward the blue. Sew the two parts together as shown and finish the corner unit by adding a red C triangle. Make 4 corner units. See Fig. 1.

Make the top and bottom row of the block by sewing a corner to either side of a blue D rectangle to create a row. Press toward the blue. Make the center row by stitching a blue D rectangle to either side of the F background square. Press toward the blue. Sew the three rows together as shown to complete the center of the block. See Fig. 2.

Sew a 3 1/2-inch by 91/2-inch background rectangle to the top and bottom of the center block. Press toward the background. Sew a 31/2-inch by 15 1/2-inch background rectangle to the sides of the center block. Press toward the background. See Fig. 3.

THE ‘POPPIES’ BOOK AND ONLINE RESOURCES

Check your local quilt shop for the new book “Where Poppies Grow: Quilts and Projects Honoring Those Who Served in World War I,” or go to KansasCityStarQuilts.com (click Shop Online). The retail price is $27.95.

A free download of the appliqué elements for the wreath surrounding each block of the “Poppies” quilt and the complete supply list will be available through the end of January at the website above; click Resources.

Block 12 will be available as a free download for one week on the website (click Shop Online). After that, a downloadable pattern will be available for $3.95.

THE 2015 QUILT: ‘HAZEL’S DIARY’

The Kansas City’s Star’s 2015 quilt project will be introduced Jan. 18 here in H+H. Shelly Pagliai of Wien, Mo., designed “Hazel’s Diary,” featuring appliquéd wildflowers over pieced blocks using reproduction fabric with a 1950s look.

Throughout the year, we’ll take a look back at life in the 1950s as seen through the eyes of a teenager, Hazel Ilene.

Look for “Hazel’s Diary” blocks the third Sunday of each month.

A ‘POPPIES’ QUILT DISPLAY

As part of the centennial observance of the start of World War I, The Kansas City Star and the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial are offering an opportunity for readers to exhibit completed versions of the 2014 Star Quilt at the museum in June 2015.

If you’d like for your quilt to be considered for exhibition, submit the following images and information to quilts@worldwar.org by March 31: A photo of the entire quilt (not just a block); the completed dimensions; the name of the person who pieced the quilt and who quilted it; a street address, phone number and email address.

This is not a contest. The above information is needed for exhibition logistics only.

FINISHING YOUR QUILT

Border supply list

2 1/2 yards background fabric

2 1/4 yards red border fabric

10 1/2 inches by 22 inches blue fabric

20 inches fusible web

Cutting directions and construction

From the background fabric, cut:

1 (14 1/2-inch) strip across the width of fabric. Subcut into the following pieces:

8 (14 1/2-inch by 2 1/2-inch) rectangles (A)

4 (5 3/8-inch) squares (G)

Cut the remaining pieces on the lengthwise grain of fabric:

2 (74 1/2-inch by 3 1/2-inch) strips (F)

2 (62 1/2-inch by 4 1/2-inch) strips (C)

2 (54 1/2-inch by 3 1/2-inch) strips (D)

1 (54 1/2-inch by 9 1/2-inch) strip (E)

3 (46 1/2-inch by 2 1/2-inch) strips (B)

Trace 14 border stars onto fusible web, press onto background fabric and cut.

From the red border fabric, cut on the lengthwise grain of fabric:

4 (74 1/2-inch by 3 1/2-inch) strips (F)

2 (54 1/2-inch by 3 1/2-inch) strips (D)

Using the template provided, trace 3 swags onto fusible web, press onto the red fabric and cut.

From the blue fabric, cut:

2 (10-inch) squares (H)

Refer to the diagram and make four horizontal rows of three blocks, adding the A pieces as shown. Stitch a background B strip to the bottom of each of the first three rows. Stitch the rows together. Add a background C strip to either side of the center, then add a background E piece to the bottom.

Appliqué the three red swags to the top edge of a background D strip and stitch to the quilt top.

Stitch a red F strip to either side of a background F strip. Draw a diagonal line on a background G square. Place on one corner of the sewn strips with right sides facing. Stitch on the line and trim. Repeat on the other corner. Make 2 and sew to either side of the quilt.

Appliqué seven border stars to each of the blue H squares. Trim to 9 1/2 inches. Stitch a red D strip to either side of a background D strip. Sew a blue H square to each end of the strip set and stitch to the top of the quilt.

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