House & Home

Outdoorsy couple discover urban oasis in midtown Kansas City

Molly and Ryne Moody share a 790-square-foot midtown Kansas City studio with their border collie/lab mix, Malakai. The couple also have a cat named Wilma. They moved to a spot in the lush depths of Kansas City’s Roanoke Park. “What we liked most about this place was that it feels serene and secluded,” Molly says. “Not too many people know about it.”
Molly and Ryne Moody share a 790-square-foot midtown Kansas City studio with their border collie/lab mix, Malakai. The couple also have a cat named Wilma. They moved to a spot in the lush depths of Kansas City’s Roanoke Park. “What we liked most about this place was that it feels serene and secluded,” Molly says. “Not too many people know about it.”

A good rental can be hard to find. That’s how Molly and Ryne Moody know they’ve found a hidden gem in the lush depths of Kansas City’s Roanoke Park that suits their minimalist and outdoorsy lifestyle.

“What we liked most about this place was that it feels serene and secluded,” Molly says. “Not too many people know about it.”

While riding his bike to work one day, Ryne happened upon Grocer’s Warehouse, a repurposed complex in midtown Kansas City that houses Hufft Projects — a design/build/fabricate firm — and 14 rental units. The complex also offers bonuses for residents, including secure hanging bike storage, a community lounge, gym access, an outdoor recreation area and art in all the shared spaces.

The Moodys call Hufft’s project management style and amenities “innovative and creative.”

“They wanted a community where everyone knows each other,” says Molly, an event manager.

The couple were the first residents to move into the building in February. With the pick of the litter, they chose a studio loft, with only 790 square feet to share between them and their two pets.

“We like doing a lot with little space,” Molly says.

After moving four times in five years, the couple determined they didn’t want to keep moving unnecessary stuff.

“When you pack it all up, it feels never-ending,” Molly says. “We wanted to get the clutter out.”

As newlyweds, they never even registered for gifts — they asked for cards and cash. Books and plants are about the extent of their decorations. And you almost don’t even realize it, but there is no couch.

“It felt overcrowded, so we got two chairs instead,” Molly says.

Their space and everything in it is easy to clean, doesn’t cost them much and opens up loads of time to spend outdoors.

“We always get outside whenever we can,” says Ryne, a supervisor at a tire center.

Their easy-come, easy-go lifestyle serves them in many ways.

“It’s easier on the wallet,” Ryne says. “A lot of times people go out and buy something to make themselves happy; we just take our dog to the park.”

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