Music News & Reviews

KC concerts Oct. 10-16: Mary Chapin Carpenter and Shawn Colvin, Benny Golson, Joey Cool

Mary Chapin Carpenter and Shawn Colvin

7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10, at Helzberg Hall

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Shawn Colvin MICHAEL WILSON



Even though Mary Chapin Carpenter and Shawn Colvin perform similar forms of music, artificial genre distinctions and the marketing department of their shared record label kept them in separate lanes in the 1990s. Carpenter was effectively promoted as a mainstream country star. Colvin was presented as an esoteric folk-rock artist. More than 20 years past each woman’s commercial peak, it’s clear the partition between Carpenter and Colvin, who will swap songs in an acoustic duo setting, was arbitrary. 816-994-7222. Tickets are $39-$89 through kauffmancenter.org.

Soccer Mommy

9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, at Bottleneck

A week after attending performances by Clairo, Snail Mail and Beabadobee at the Middle of the Map Fest, fans will travel to Lawrence to catch Sophie Allison of Soccer Mommy. As with the top-billed acts at Middle of the Map, Allison, 22, is at the vanguard of a new wave of women who are invigorating indie rock. This headlining show is an anomaly. Allison just completed a string of dates with Vampire Weekend and is slated to go on tour with Wilco. With Una Walkenhorst. 785-749-3434. Tickets are $14 through thebottlenecklive.com.

Kansas City Jazz Orchestra with Benny Golson

8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, at Helzberg Hall

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Benny Golson DAMIAN DOVARGANES AP



Of the 57 jazz musicians depicted in the famous 1958 photograph known as “A Great Day in Harlem,” only Benny Golson and Sonny Rollins are still alive. Golson, 90, is more than an unflaggingly gracious and admirably elegant survivor. He’s one of the most accomplished composers in jazz history. New arrangements of the classic Golson compositions “Blues March,” “I Remember Clifford,” “Killer Joe” and “Stablemates” written by members of the Kansas City Jazz Orchestra will feature Golson on saxophone. 816-994-7222. Tickets are $32-$67 through kauffmancenter.org.

Joey Cool

9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, at Riot Room

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Joey Cool SARA FISH



No one on the roster of Strange Music has come close to challenging the dominance of the record label’s co-founder Tech N9ne. Joey Cool, a recent addition to the Strange Music family, is the latest contender. The Kansas City rapper is receiving a big push for his new album, “Old Habits Die Hard.” He’s joined by prominent label mates Tech N9ne, Krizz Kaliko and Ubi on the project and will likely be joined by a few of his high-profile friends Friday. 816-442-8179. Tickets are $15 through theriotroom.com.

Kevin Gates

9 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13, at Arvest Bank Theatre at the Midland

Kevin Gates is full of contradictions. The Southern rapper boasts of his criminal record even as he proclaims his faith in God. He asserts his identity as a Muslim on his new album, “I’m Him.” He also admits that “they say that I murdered my best friend — it was just business, it wasn’t personal.” He’ll perform selections from “I’m Him” along with hits including “Really Really” and “2 Phones.” With YK Osiris, Rod Wave and Sdot Fresh. 816-283-9900. Tickets are $43-$53 through arvestbanktheatre.com.

Tank and the Bangas

8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14, at The Truman

Some groups are known for innovative music, others for an amazing vocalist or a stellar instrumentalist. Tank and the Bangas specialize in spreading communal joy. The group from New Orleans fronted by Tarriona “Tank” Ball exudes life-affirming, smile-inducing positivity. The winners of NPR’s prestigious Tiny Desk Contest in 2017, Tank and the Bangas are touring in support of “Green Balloon,” a new album of jaunty songs informed by hip-hop, soul and jazz. With Pell and Arquesta Del SolSoul. 816-205-8560. Tickets are $20 through thetrumankc.com.

Mt. Joy

8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14, at Madrid Theatre

For a style of music that purports to reflect the tenor of the times, the Americana genre has produced surprisingly few prominent songs addressing current political and social quandaries. Mt. Joy’s popular 2017 song “Sheep” doesn’t provide any solutions, but the lyrics of the band’s composition reflect racial strife and heartache: “There is blood on the streets of Baltimore, kids are getting ready for a long war, maybe I was born in the wrong skin.” With Wilderado. 816-753-8880. Tickets are $22-$72 through madridtheatre.com.

NF

8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, at Uptown Theater

NF is proof that fame and fortune don’t necessarily result in happiness or peace of mind. Nate Feuerstein sounds positively miserable on his latest chart-topping album, “The Search.” He resembles a marginally gentler version of fellow Michigan rapper Eminem as he examines his anguish on the aptly titled “Leave Me Alone”: “I went from nobody to kinda famous/Hide my plaques inside the closet ... just leave them on the ground right next to my self-hatred.” With Kyd the Band. 816-753-8665. Tickets are $41.50-$91.50 through uptowntheater.com.

Jay Som

8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, at Granada

Melina Mae Duterte, the musician who performs as Jay Som, recently praised Jeff Tweedy of Wilco in a video feature created by the music site Pitchfork. Even though Duterte, 25, is less than half Tweedy’s age, her admiration for the veteran rock star isn’t surprising. Her exquisite new album, “Anak Ko,” builds on the mature, guitar-based form of indie rock that Tweedy developed when Duterte was a teenager. “Anak Ko” serves as an affectionate homage to Wilco’s 2007 album, “Sky Blue Sky.” With Boy Scouts and Gia Margaret. 785-842-1390. Tickets are $13 through thegranada.com.

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