Music News & Reviews

KC concerts Feb. 14-20: Blake Shelton, Charlie Wilson, Travis Scott, 2Cellos

Blake Shelton
Blake Shelton Invision/AP

Rainbow Kitten Surprise

8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, at The Truman

Rainbow Kitten Surprise is a throwback to the era in which the good-time jams of Hootie & the Blowfish and the Dave Matthews Band captivated young audiences. The members of Rainbow Kitten Surprise began creating upbeat music in their dormitory while attending Appalachian State University in Boone, N.C., in 2013. Their homespun sound and substantive lyrical themes resonate with listeners who dismiss the latest developments in popular music as trite and artificial. With Mt. Joy. 816-205-8560. Face value of tickets to sold-out show is $32.50. Details at thetrumankc.com.

Charlie Wilson

8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 14, at Municipal Auditorium

Spending a portion of Valentine’s Day in the company of an R&B institution is a dream come true for amorous aficionados of soul music. As a member of the Gap Band and as a solo artist, Wilson is responsible for some of the grooviest love songs of the past several decades. Wilson is the lead vocalist on romantic Gap Band classics of the 1980s “Outstanding” and “Yearning for Your Love.” His more recent solo hits include the sentimental “There Goes My Baby” and “Touched By an Angel.” With Joe. 800-745-3000. Tickets are $42.50-$85.50 through ticketmaster.com.

Fidlar

8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 14, at The Truman

Few bands explore the often lethal relationship between rock ’n’ roll and substance abuse with more unbridled enthusiasm and unfiltered honesty than Fidlar. The Los Angeles punk band’s discography is loaded with songs about intoxication. Fidlar’s approach to the topic is growing increasingly nuanced. On “By Myself,” a particularly woozy track on Fidlar’s new album, Zac Carper yelps, “Everybody thinks that I need professional help,” before asking, “Why does getting sober make you feel like a loner?” With the Sluts. 816-205-8560. Tickets are $10 through thetrumankc.com.

Blake Shelton

7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 15, at Sprint Center

The country star’s good looks, charming roguishness and Southern drawl have made him a popular judge on NBC’s “The Voice.” Shelton’s personality is also the primary attraction of his amusing hits such as “I’ll Name the Dog” and “Boys ’Round Here.” With the Bellamy Brothers, John Anderson, Trace Adkins and Lauren Alaina. 816-949-7000. Tickets are $49-$129 through sprintcenter.com.

Kandace Springs

8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 15, at Folly Theater

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JEFF FORNEY

The regal vocalist Nancy Wilson died in December, but the elegant crossover jazz that’s her legacy is in good hands. Kandace Springs, an exceptionally promising artist based in Nashville, honors the late star by adding contemporary flourishes to Wilson’s sophisticated style. Springs demonstrated her appeal to pop fans as the opening act on the Hall & Oates arena tour that stopped at the Sprint Center last summer. She’s likely to emphasize her improvisational side during her appearance in the Folly Jazz Series. 816-474-4444. Tickets are $20-$55 through follytheater.org.

Pop Evil

7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 15, at The Truman

Comedian Don Jamieson will tell music-related gags before Pop Evil’s headlining appearance, but some fans of heavy metal and hard rock insist the Michigan band itself is a joke. Pop Evil’s detractors believe that its post-grunge sound is overly derivative of unfashionable groups like Nickelback. Even so, there’s no denying the power of the epic riffs on testosterone-fueled Pop Evil songs such as “Ways To Get High.” With Them Evils. 816-205-8560. Tickets are $23 through thetrumankc.com.

Travis Scott

8 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17, at Sprint Center

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Rapper Travis Scott is also dad to Stormi Webster, whose mom is Kylie Jenner. ANDY KROPA Invision/AP

“Sicko Mode,” one of the biggest songs of 2018, is five minutes of relentless boasting. Travis Scott saves one of his most impressive accomplishments for the final line of the hit: “baby mama cover Forbes.” Kylie Jenner — the woman touted in a Forbes cover story as “the youngest ever self-made billionaire” — is the mother of Scott’s daughter Stormi. Accordingly, the psychedelic hip-hop songs of the Houston rapper sound as if they’re gilded with gold. With Sheck Wes. 816-949-7000. Tickets are $30-$130 through sprintcenter.com.

Le Butcherettes

8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 18, at RecordBar

Teresa Suárez Cosío, the rocker also known as Teri Gender Bender, specializes in making people uncomfortable. The dynamic front person of the Mexican punk band Le Butcherettes invades the physical and psychic personal space of audiences. Her band’s aggressive attack reflects Cosio’s confrontational approach. “Bi/Mental,” Le Butcherettes’ first album in more than three years, often sounds like a winning collaboration between blustery vocalist Billy Idol and the iconic punk band Sleater-Kinney. With Stars at Night and New Obsessions. 816-753-5207. Tickets are $15 through therecordbar.com.

2Cellos

7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19, at Sprint Center

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Stjepan Hauser and Luka Šulić of 2Cellos ROBB D. COHEN Invision/AP

Members of the marketing departments of traditional classical music institutions might want to take notes at performances by 2Cellos. The Croatian cellist duo of Stjepan Hauser and Luka Šulić perform in arenas, proving that audiences are eager to enjoy beautiful melodies and stirring anthems played by classically trained artists if they’re accompanied by sparkling visual elements. With Jon McLaughlin. 816-949-7000. Tickets are $31.50-$69.50 through sprintcenter.com.

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