Music News & Reviews

KC concerts Aug. 9-15: Drake, Charlie Puth, Rod Stewart & Cyndi Lauper, Los Lobos

FILE - In this June 27, 2015 file photo, Canadian singer Drake performs on the main stage at Wireless festival in Finsbury Park, London. All 25 tracks from Drakeâs ultra-popular âScorpionâ album, released on June 29, are on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. (Photo by Jonathan Short/Invision/AP, File)
FILE - In this June 27, 2015 file photo, Canadian singer Drake performs on the main stage at Wireless festival in Finsbury Park, London. All 25 tracks from Drakeâs ultra-popular âScorpionâ album, released on June 29, are on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. (Photo by Jonathan Short/Invision/AP, File) Jonathan Short/Invision/AP

Charlie Puth

Thursday, Aug. 9, at Starlight Theatre

Charlie Puth’s new release, “Voicenotes,” is one of sultriest soul-based pop albums since Justin Timberlake topped the charts with “FutureSex/LoveSounds” in 2006. The album by the man who rose to fame as a YouTube sensation is a vast improvement over Puth’s debut effort. Once known for insipid material like the irksome hit “Marvin Gaye” and the sentimental smash “See You Again,” Puth demonstrates that he’s a sophisticated pop prodigy on the recent hits “Attention” and “How Long.” With Hailee Steinfeld.

7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9. Starlight Theatre. 816-363-7827. Tickets are $30-$69.50 through kcstarlight.com.

Curtis Salgado

Thursday, Aug. 9, at Knuckleheads

Curtis Salgado will display two very different components of his considerable talent at Knuckleheads on Thursday. In addition to performing raucous roadhouse blues with a full band, the seasoned vocalist will play an acoustic set of material from the startlingly rustic new album “Raw Cut” with guitarist Alan Hager. Salgado’s friendship with the late John Belushi served as an inspiration for the Blues Brothers. “Briefcase Full of Blues,” the 1978 album Belushi made with Dan Aykroyd, is dedicated to Salgado.

8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9. Knuckleheads. 816-483-1456. Tickets are $12-$20 through knuckleheadskc.com.

Highly Suspect

Thursday, Aug. 9, at the Arvest Bank Theatre at the Midland

When the Massachusetts band Highly Suspect received Grammy Award nominations in the categories of best rock song and best rock album in 2015, even ardent fans of the form were perplexed. The trio was virtually unknown. Highly Suspect has since become a prominent purveyor of post-Nirvana grunge in the tradition of groups like Kansas City’s Puddle of Mudd and Radkey. The latter locally based band is on the undercard of Thursday’s powerhouse bill. With DJ Redbees and Monk Tamony.

8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9. Arvest Bank Theatre at the Midland. 816-283-9921. Tickets are $27.50 through midlandkc.com.

Drake

Friday, Aug. 10, at the Sprint Center

Success doesn’t always result in contentment. Drake is by most metrics the most popular music-maker in the world, but he sounds positively miserable on his new album, “Scorpion.” The rapper details his many grievances on dyspeptic tracks like “I’m Upset.” Drake’s indignant approach resonates with fans. “Scorpion” was the first album to obtain more than a billion streams in the first week of its release. Drake assumes a much happier demeanor at his concerts. Friday’s show is likely to resemble a joyous victory celebration. With Migos. (The concert was originally scheduled for July 31.)

7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 10. Sprint Center. 816-949-7100. Tickets are $59.50-$179.50 through sprintcenter.com.

Los Lobos

Friday, Aug. 10, at Knuckleheads

After decades of touring furiously and recording brilliant albums at an impressive clip, Los Lobos is slowing down. The band hasn’t released an album in almost three years and no longer creates innovative sounds. The thrill of the new may be gone, but the potent music made by the core group of Steve Berlin, David Hidalgo, Conrad Lozano, Louie Pérez and Cesar Rosas still allows Los Lobos to be considered one of the world’s best rock bands. With Big Head Todd & the Monsters and Greyhounds.

7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 10. Knuckleheads. 816-483-1456. Tickets are $59.50-$99.50 through knuckleheadskc.com.

Vogts Sisters

Saturday, Aug. 11, at Knuckleheads

Size doesn’t matter in old-timey music. The Nashville-based band Old Crow Medicine Show will entertain a throng of rapturous fans of vintage sounds in Kansas City on Wednesday, Aug. 15, while the Vogts Sisters will play in a room that seats only four dozen on Saturday. The intimacy of the latter show at the Gospel Lounge at Knuckleheads is likely to make it the more rewarding of the two experiences. Abigail and Maggie Vogts, a duo based in Erie, Kan., create charmingly unassuming folk music highlighted by glorious family harmonies.

8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11. Knuckleheads. 816-483-1456. Tickets are $10 through knuckleheadskc.com.

Rod Stewart

Tuesday, Aug. 14, at Sprint Center

Rod Stewart is still a lovable rogue. The British icon, 73, continues to sport a mop of blond hair while belting out his classic songs with boyish enthusiasm. His recent interpretations of the Great American Songbook were surprisingly popular, but the set lists of Stewart’s recent shows have been dominated by his rock and pop hits from the 1970s and 1980s like the disco-inspired “Do Ya Think I’m Sexy” and the caddish breakup song “Maggie May.” With Cyndi Lauper.

7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 14. Sprint Center. 816-949-7100. Tickets are $35-$199.50 through sprintcenter.com.

Old Crow Medicine Show

Wednesday, Aug. 15, at the Arvest Bank Theatre at the Midland

Anyone who feels as if they’ve already heard “Wagon Wheel” one too many times is advised to avoid the Arvest Bank Theatre at the Midland on Wednesday. The reworking of a Bob Dylan discard by Ketch Secor of Old Crow Medicine Show is a folksy ditty that’s seemingly in the repertoire of every folk-oriented musician in North America. Yet the band is far from a one-trick pony. A member of the Grand Ole Opry, Old Crow Medicine Show is the pre-eminent old-timey band. With Victor & Penny.

8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 15. Arvest Bank Theatre at the Midland. 816-283-9921. Tickets are $32-$44 through midlandkc.com.

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